Positive results reported with intraocular pressure-lowering drug in glaucoma

December 23, 2016

Trabodenoson, a new drug delivered directly to the eye, offers patients with ocular hypertension or primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) a new mechanism of action for combating elevated intraocular pressure. The results of a Phase 2 clinical trial of trabodenoson that show the drug to be well tolerated and clinically effective are presented in Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Study subjects with ocular hypertension or POAG received either trabodenoson at increasing doses or placebo in one eye twice daily for 14 days. Another group of patients received either a much higher dose of trabodenoson or placebo for 28 days. The researchers report statistically significant, dose-dependent, clinically relevant decreases in intraocular pressure with trabodenoson.

"This study is important because trabodenoson is a new compound class for glaucoma that targets the diseased tissue responsible for ," says Editor-in-Chief W. Daniel Stamer, PhD, Joseph A. C. Wadsworth Professor of Ophthalmology and Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC. "Positive findings with this new drug have motivated phase III , which are underway."

Explore further: Agomelatine cuts ocular pressure with glaucoma

More information: Jonathan S. Myers et al. A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of 2 and 4 Weeks of Twice-Daily Ocular Trabodenoson in Adults with Ocular Hypertension or Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma, Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics (2016). DOI: 10.1089/jop.2015.0148

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