Teaching service cuts resource use in COPD exacerbations

January 9, 2017

(HealthDay)—An internal medicine teaching service can reduce resource use in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) in a community teaching hospital, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Khalid Abusaada, M.D., from Florida Hospital in Orlando, and colleagues conducted a involving patients admitted for a primary diagnosis of COPD exacerbation to examine the impact of an internal medicine teaching service versus a nonteaching service at a large community teaching hospital. The authors measured risk-adjusted length of stay (LOS), cost of hospitalization, 30-day readmissions, and mortality rate. Data were extracted for 1,419 patients: 306 in the teaching group and 1,113 in the nonteaching group.

The researchers found that the teaching group had significantly lower risk-adjusted cost and LOS than the nonteaching group (observed/expected cost, 0.66 versus 1.06; observed/expected LOS, 0.93 versus 1.69). Risk-adjusted mortality and readmissions did not differ significantly between the groups. The teaching group had significantly lower use of consults, with 73 and 31 percent of patients in the teaching and nonteaching groups having no consults, respectively. After adjustment for other variables, the teaching service correlated with significantly decreased use of consults (odds ratio, 0.17).

"The service had more favorable outcomes compared to nonteaching services in patients hospitalized for AECOPD," the authors write.

Explore further: Patients more satisfied with care from hospitalists

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Patients more satisfied with care from hospitalists

February 8, 2016
(HealthDay)—More patients report satisfaction with overall care in a nonteaching hospitalist service than in a general medicine teaching service, according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of Hospital ...

More lumbar Sx complications at teaching hospitals

March 12, 2014
(HealthDay)—Patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery at teaching hospitals incur longer hospitalizations and have more postoperative complications compared to those treated at nonteaching hospitals, according to a study ...

Heart failure care up, regardless of hospital teaching status

October 26, 2016
(HealthDay)—Adherence to performance measures is similar at teaching hospitals (TH) and nonteaching hospitals (NTH), according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Incidence of hospital-acquired anemia during MI varies

March 27, 2014
(HealthDay)—For patients hospitalized with myocardial infarction, the incidence of hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) varies considerably across hospitals, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of The American ...

Teaching and safety-net hospitals show variations in quality and outcomes of care

June 17, 2013
Teaching hospitals with a higher intensity of physician-training activity achieve lower mortality rates, but higher hospitalization readmission rates for key medical diagnoses, reports a study in the July issue of Medical ...

Recommended for you

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke

January 15, 2018
Starting periods early—before the age of 12—is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads

January 15, 2018
Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

Your dishwasher is not as sterile as you think

January 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Your dishwasher may get those plates spotless, but it is also probably teeming with bacteria and fungus, a new study suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.