Among colon cancer patients, smokers have worse outcomes than non-smokers

Smoking
Cigarette smoke damages DNA within minutes after inhalation. Credit: iStock

In an analysis of more than 18,000 patients treated for colon cancer, current smokers were 14 percent more likely to die from their colon cancer within five years than patients who had never smoked.

Among patients treated by surgery only, current smokers were 21 percent more likely to die from their colon cancer than patients who had never smoked.

"While further research is needed to elucidate mechanisms, continued efforts to encourage and cessation may yield benefits in terms of improved survival from ," wrote the authors of the Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics study.


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More information: L. Sharp et al, Smoking at diagnosis significantly decreases 5-year cancer-specific survival in a population-based cohort of 18 166 colon cancer patients, Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2017). DOI: 10.1111/apt.13944
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Citation: Among colon cancer patients, smokers have worse outcomes than non-smokers (2017, February 8) retrieved 27 June 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-02-colon-cancer-patients-smokers-worse.html
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