Smoking worsens outcomes with advanced colon cancer

April 6, 2013
Smoking worsens outcomes with advanced colon cancer
Smoking is tied to significantly shorter disease-free survival and time to recurrence in patients undergoing treatment for stage III colon cancer, according to a study published April 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—Smoking is tied to significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) and time to recurrence (TTR) in patients undergoing treatment for stage III colon cancer, according to a study published April 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Amanda Phipps, Ph.D., from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash., and colleagues surveyed patients participating in a randomized adjuvant trial (infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin [FOLFOX] or FOLFOX plus ). A total of 1,968 patients were questioned on smoking history and other risk factors.

The researchers found that ever-smokers experienced significantly shorter DFS, compared with never-smokers (three-year DFS proportion 70 percent versus 74 percent; hazard ratio [HR], 1.21). Even after adjusting for other variables, this association persisted (HR, 1.23), although there was significant interaction in this association based on BRAF mutation status in patients with BRAF wild-type, smoking was associated with shorter DFS (HR, 1.36) but not BRAF mutated (HR, 0.80; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.50 to 1.29) . In those with KRAS mutated versus KRAS wild-type colon cancer there was a stronger associated between smoking and poorer DFS (HR, 1.50 versus HR, 1.09 [95 percent CI, 0.85 to 1.39]), although interaction by KRAS mutation status was not statistically significant (P = .07). Similar associations were seen with TTR analysis.

"Overall, smoking was significantly associated with shorter DFS and TTR in patients with colon cancer," the authors write.
Several authors report to the diagnostics industry.

Explore further: No benefit seen for adjuvant oxaliplatin in stage II colon CA

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Lurker2358
not rated yet Apr 06, 2013
There is nothing good to say about smoking.

Why is this evil habit still legal in the civilized world?

Let's hope marijuana stays banned as well. A federal constitutional amendment ensuring it's illegality would be a good move.
RichMurray
not rated yet Apr 08, 2013
The smoke from a pack of cigarettes (20 grams tobacco) gives 40 mg methanol, the same as from two cans aspartame diet drink -- methanol has a blood half-life of 3 hours and readily enters every cell of the body and the fetus every minute with the bloodstream -- the 20 human tissues with high levels of ADH1 enzyme make methanol into formaldehyde inside cells -- the inner walls of most blood vessels, retina rods and cones, skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, the lining of the GI tract -- humans lack an effective catalyze defense system against this common toxicity, and so are up to a hundred times more vulnerable than any other creature. Did this study check for aspartame use? Other major methanol sources include fresh tomatoes, and unfresh fruits juices vegetables cut up and preserved wet at room temperature in sealed cans jars. Low level daily use of alcohol is a direct antidote to this methanol formaldehyde toxic process, so nondrinkers beware. Search, WC Monte, WhileScienceSleeps

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