Caloric restriction normalizes bile acid, cholesterol deficiency

March 20, 2017

(HealthDay)—Acute caloric restriction normalizes hepatic bile acid (BA) and cholesterol deficiency that is seen in morbidly obese women, according to a study published online March 6 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Sara Straniero, Ph.D., from Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, and colleagues monitored 10 morbidly obese women on days zero, three, seven, 14, and 28 after initiating a low-calorie diet. They collected serum and determined liver size and fat content. The results were compared with those from 54 non-obese women who served as controls.

The researchers found that, compared with controls, the obese group had elevated synthesis of both BAs and cholesterol and of BAs and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) at baseline. BA and cholesterol synthesis and serum BA and PCSK9 levels normalized after three days on the low-calorie diet, while increased. There was no change in fibroblast growth factor 19 and triglyceride levels, and a 10 percent decrease was seen in liver volume.

"The results suggest that hepatic BAs and cholesterol are deficient in morbid obesity," the authors write. "Caloric restriction rapidly counteracts these deficiencies, normalizing BA and and circulating PCSK9 levels, indicating that overproduction of in enlarged peripheral tissues cannot explain this phenotype."

Explore further: New lipid-lowering drugs help patients reduce LDL cholesterol

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

New lipid-lowering drugs help patients reduce LDL cholesterol

August 1, 2016
A recent analysis indicates that adding new therapies called anti-PCSK9 antibodies to other lipid-lowering treatments can help patients lower their LDL cholesterol levels.

PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies show promise in ACS

March 23, 2016
(HealthDay)—Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) monoclonal antibodies may represent a promising treatment option for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to a review published online March 22 in the ...

US regulators give limited approval to cholesterol drug

July 25, 2015
US regulators on Friday approved a new cholesterol drug called Praluent, made by Sanofi and Regeneron, for people with certain genetic risk factors for heart disease.

Greater drop in LDL seen with atorvastatin plus PCSK9 antibody

November 2, 2012
(HealthDay)—Addition of the fully human serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 monoclonal antibody, SAR236553, to atorvastatin is associated with greater reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels ...

PCSK9 inhibitors reduce lipoprotein (a) production

October 31, 2016
A new study published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science sheds light on PCSK9 inhibitors, a new class of low density lipoprotein (LDL) lowering drugs, and their impact on another risk factor for heart disease, ...

Risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes affected by PCSK9 and HMGCR genetic variations

November 30, 2016
In a new study published in the December 1, 2016 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and a collaboration of international researchers, studied variants in the ...

Recommended for you

Researchers investigate the potential of spider silk protein for engineering artificial heart

August 18, 2017
Ever more people are suffering from cardiac insufficiency, despite significant advances in preventing and minimising damage to the heart. The main cause of reduced cardiac functionality lies in the irreversible loss of cardiac ...

Lasers used to detect risk of heart attack and stroke

August 18, 2017
Patients at risk of heart attacks and strokes may be spotted earlier thanks to a diagnosis tool that uses near-infrared light to identify high-risk arterial plaques, according to research carried out at WMG, University of ...

How Gata4 helps mend a broken heart

August 15, 2017
During a heart attack, blood stops flowing into the heart; starved for oxygen, part of the heart muscle dies. The heart muscle does not regenerate; instead it replaces dead tissue with scars made of cells called fibroblasts ...

Injectable tissue patch could help repair damaged organs

August 14, 2017
A team of U of T Engineering researchers is mending broken hearts with an expanding tissue bandage a little smaller than a postage stamp.

'Fat but fit' are at increased risk of heart disease

August 14, 2017
Carrying extra weight could raise your risk of heart attack by more than a quarter, even if you are otherwise healthy.

Air pollution linked to cardiovascular disease; air purifiers may lessen impact

August 14, 2017
Exposure to high levels of air pollution increased stress hormone levels and negative metabolic changes in otherwise healthy, young adults in a recent study conducted in China. Air purifiers appeared to lessen the negative ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.