Are you addicted to your smartphone?

May 19, 2017 by Joan Mcclusky, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—As great as smartphones are, you can get too attached to the gadgets.

According to experts at the Cleveland Clinic's Center for Behavioral Health, cell phone overuse can be just like any other kind of addiction. And here are two warning signs: your is interfering with your life, and you get when you try cutting back.

Ask yourself these questions to check on the health of your relationship with your phone.

  • Is using your smartphone getting in the way of work or making it hard to concentrate on tasks?
  • Do you think about your smartphone even when you're not using it?
  • Do you feel impatient and irritable if you're not holding it?
  • Do you check your phone constantly, and for longer than you intended? Do say you use it too much?

If your smartphone use is in the , take steps to cut back. Try to set aside a few hours of no-phone time every day. Set goals and keep track of what you're doing without your phone, such as reading or being with your family.

Set aside time at the end of the day for relaxing activities like meditation or listening to music. Turn your phone off during these breaks. If thats too stressful, then turn off the alerts.

Above all, don't let your phone interfere with getting enough restful sleep. Stop using it at least an hour before you go to sleep—looking at gadget screens too close to bedtime can interfere with the body's natural process of winding down before bed in anticipation of shuteye. And be sure not to charge it in your bedroom if you charge it overnight so that it can't wake you if you get a message.

Explore further: Your cell phone could curb the intensity of your workout

More information: The Cleveland Clinic has more tips on dealing with smartphone stress.

Related Stories

Your cell phone could curb the intensity of your workout

January 11, 2017
Want to get every perk possible from your power walk? Turn off your cell phone, advises Michael Rebold, Ph.D., assistant professor of integrative exercise science at Hiram College. In two recent studies published by Computers ...

World's first washable smartphone to debut in Japan

December 4, 2015
Tired of those unsightly smudges and other dirt on your bacteria-laden smartphone?

Increased smartphone screen-time associated with lower sleep quality

November 9, 2016
Exposure to smartphone screens is associated with lower sleep quality, according to a study published November 9, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthew Christensen from the University of California, San Francisco, ...

Sleep: the great motivator

February 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—If you really want to follow through on your New Year's resolutions, make sure you get enough sleep.

Recommended for you

New study rebuts the claim that antidepressants do not work

August 18, 2017
A theory that has gained considerable attention in international media, including Newsweek and the CBS broadcast 60 minutes, suggests that antidepressant drugs such as the SSRIs do not exert any actual antidepressant effect. ...

Should I stay or should I leave? Untangling what goes on when a relationship is being questioned

August 17, 2017
Knowing whether to stay in or leave a romantic relationship is often an agonizing experience and that ambivalence can have negative consequences for health and well-being.

Kids learn moral lessons more effectively from stories with humans than human-like animals

August 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto found that four to six-year-olds shared more after listening to books with human characters than books with anthropomorphic ...

History of stress increases miscarriage risk, says new review

August 17, 2017
A history of exposure to psychological stress can increase the risk of miscarriage by upto 42 per cent, according to a new review.

Study finds children pay close attention to potentially threatening information, avoid eye contact when anxious

August 17, 2017
We spend a lot of time looking at the eyes of others for social cues – it helps us understand a person's emotions, and make decisions about how to respond to them. We also know that adults avoid eye contact when anxious. ...

Communicating in a foreign language takes emotion out of decision making

August 16, 2017
If you could save the lives of five people by pushing another bystander in front of a train to his death, would you do it? And should it make any difference if that choice is presented in a language you speak, but isn't your ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.