Five great diet breakfasts

May 8, 2017 by Joan Mcclusky, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—When it comes to losing weight, Simon says, "Eat breakfast."

Skipping breakfast to cut calories just puts you in starvation mode mid-morning, derailing your diet for the rest of the day. Eating breakfast, on the other hand, gets your metabolism going for the rest of the day.

But if you're tired of cold cereal, consider these variations on breakfast options—each clocking in at less than 250 calories.

  • Smoothie. Blend a cup of skim milk or no-fat yogurt with a cup of frozen chunks or a banana.
  • Waffle. Top a whole-wheat waffle with sliced fruit or a dab of peanut butter.
  • Eggs. Try a quick scramble with vegetables. Whisk one whole egg with two or three extra whites for more protein and volume. Add a tasty filling—like steamed spinach, sauteed red peppers and zucchini—or a fast two tablespoons of salsa. Wrap it up in a small whole-wheat tortilla for a to-go meal.
  • Oatmeal. For a hearty breakfast, make oatmeal with skim milk rather than water for the protein, calcium and vitamin D. Sweeten it naturally with berries or vanilla and cinnamon.
  • Fruit. For a fun breakfast, try a parfait. In a tall glass, layer one-half cup of sliced fruit with one cup of Greek yogurt and a tablespoon of slivered almonds.

Bottom line: Eating a healthy, filling spells diet success.

Explore further: Healthy breakfast is essential for kids

More information: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has many quick ideas for nourishing breakfasts, from traditional to novel.

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