Got 10 minutes to spare?

May 10, 2017 by Julie Davis, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—If you're looking for big fitness results in a small amount of time, a twist on high-intensity interval training just might fit the bill. It also should fit into most anyone's busy schedule.

Traditional interval consists of a short burst of full-out activity followed by a period of rest or low-intensity activity. There are endless ways to mix up the intensity, length and number of intervals. And interval training in any form typically results in more endurance and fat-burning benefits than working out at one steady pace for the same amount of time.

Now, researchers from Canada and Australia have developed a shortened version—called low-volume/high-intensity interval training—that they say offers the same benefits as longer sessions.

Each session consists of 10 60-second bouts of activity done at about 90 percent of your , interspersed with 60 seconds of recovery. That's a total of just 10 minutes of exercise over a 20-minute training session.

To calculate your maximum heart rate, subtract your age from 220. Then multiply that number by 0.9. For example, if you're 35, you would subtract 35 from 220 and get 185. Multiplying 185 by 0.9 would reveal a maximum heart rate of 166.5, or 166 beats a minute.

According to the researchers, doing low-volume/high-intensity interval training three times a week can improve heart health and may even help people with type 2 diabetes better control their blood sugar, even though the time commitment is much lower than the standard guideline of doing 150 minutes of moderate exercise a week.

Just be sure you're in the target zone for each 60-second high-intensity bout. Also, if you have any issues, discuss this approach with your doctor before trying it.

In addition, because of the many hazards of a sedentary lifestyle, it's important to get in some activity on non- days as well.

Explore further: High-intensity interval training rapidly improves diabetics' glucose metabolism

More information: The American College of Sports Medicine has information on high-intensity interval training.

Related Stories

High-intensity interval training rapidly improves diabetics' glucose metabolism

April 10, 2017
New research reveals that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) increases glucose metabolism in muscles as well as insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. After only a two-week training period, the glucose uptake in thigh ...

Exercise: the cellular 'fountain of youth'

March 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—High-intensity exercise may help older adults reverse certain aspects of the "cellular" aging process, a new study suggests.

Researchers find brief, intense stair climbing is a practical way to boost fitness

February 7, 2017
There are no more excuses for being out of shape. Researchers at McMaster University have found that short, intense bursts of stair climbing, which can be done virtually anywhere, have major benefits for heart health.

Pumping iron is good for the heart, researchers show

January 11, 2017
Just one session of interval weight-training can improve the risk of Type 2 diabetes complications, according to a UBC Okanagan study. This is encouraging news for those starting the New Year with good intentions.

Moderate, high-intensity exercise programs show similar results

April 17, 2017
(HealthDay)—Short-term moderate-intensity to high-intensity interval training (HIIT) leads to modest body composition improvements in overweight and obese individuals, according to research published online April 11 in ...

New research shows benefit of interval training for women

August 27, 2013
Interval training is a well-known way to get the maximum benefits of exercise in the shortest amount of time. New research shows that when it comes to running, women may get more out of high intensity interval training (HIIT) ...

Recommended for you

Male contraceptive compound stops sperm without affecting hormones

April 20, 2018
A new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE details how a compound called EP055 binds to sperm proteins to significantly slow the overall mobility of the sperm without affecting hormones, making EP055 a potential ...

A dose of empathy may support patients in pain

April 20, 2018
Research published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine suggests that empathic, positive messages from doctors may be of small benefit to patients suffering from pain, and improve their satisfaction about the care ...

New research suggests possible link between sudden infant death syndrome and air pollution

April 20, 2018
A study led by the University of Birmingham suggests a possible association between exposure to certain pollutants and an increased risk of so-called 'cot death'.

For heavy lifting, use exoskeletons with caution

April 20, 2018
You can wear an exoskeleton, but it won't turn you into a superhero.

New device to help patients with rare disease access life-saving treatment

April 19, 2018
Patients with a rare medical condition can receive life-saving treatment at the touch of a button thanks to a new device developed by scientists.

Low-cost anti-hookworm drug boosts female farmers' physical fitness

April 19, 2018
Impoverished female farm workers infected with intestinal parasites known as hookworms saw significant improvements in physical fitness when they were treated with a low-cost deworming drug. The benefits were seen even in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.