Did amount of sodium households acquire in packaged food, beverages decrease?

June 5, 2017, The JAMA Network Journals

Excessive dietary sodium is a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, and the Institute of Medicine has said it is essential to reduce sodium in packaged foods. Yet, not much is known about whether sodium in packaged foods has changed over the past 15 years. A new article published by JAMA Internal Medicine tries to answer that question.

Jennifer M. Poti, Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and coauthors used data obtained from The Nielsen Company from the 2000 to 2014 Nielsen Homescan Consumer Panel on packaged food and beverage purchases by U.S. households. Household members used a barcode scanner to record their purchases.

Among a sample of 172,042 U.S. households:

  • The amount of households acquired from packaged food and beverage purchases decreased between 2000 and 2014 by 396 mg/day per capita (the amount of sodium in milligrams purchased daily per person) from 2,363 mg/day to 1,967 mg/day.
  • The sodium content of households' packaged food purchases also decreased by 49 mg/100 g (the amount of sodium relative to the amount of food), a 12 percent decline.
  • The average sodium content of households' purchases decreased for all top food sources of sodium between 2000 and 2014, including declines of more than 100 mg/100 g for condiments, sauces and dips and salty snacks.
  • Still, less than 2 percent of U.S. households had total packaged and beverage purchases with optimal sodium density of 1.1 mg/kcal or less.

Limitations of the study include that households do not report whether all foods purchased were consumed, so the data do not reflect .

"The slow rate of decline in sodium from store-bought foods suggests that more concerted sodium reduction efforts are necessary in the United States. Future studies are needed to examine sodium trends by race/ethnicity and income to identify vulnerable subpopulations that further interventions should target," the article concludes.

Explore further: Twenty-five food categories explain 70 percent of salt intake

More information: JAMA Internal Medicine (2017). jamanetwork.com/journals/jamai … ainternmed.2017.1407

Related Stories

Twenty-five food categories explain 70 percent of salt intake

April 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—For U.S. persons, 70 percent of dietary sodium comes from 25 food categories, with bread the top contributor, according to research published in the March 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and ...

'Low-content' nutritional claims on packaged goods misleading for consumers

March 15, 2017
No fat, no sugar, no salt? What does it mean? Today, supermarket shelves are filled with products that make a variety of claims related to their perceived health benefits. As many Americans try to make better food choices, ...

Kicking the salt shaker habit may not be enough

May 8, 2017
Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal ...

Packaged food purchases at non-grocery stores are up but nutritional quality is down

October 5, 2015
What foods are Americans really buying, where are they buying them, and how nutritious are these purchases? A new study conducted by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has determined that consumers ...

Salt and sodium intake remains high in China

February 16, 2016
Yongning Wu, Ph.D., of the China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, China, and colleagues compared salt and sodium consumption in China in 2000 with 2009-2012. The study appears in the February 16 issue ...

New data may help nutrition monitoring

September 26, 2014
A new combination of household food purchases and nutrition data is being used to assess population exposure to sodium, saturated fat, and sugar in New Zealand.

Recommended for you

Male contraceptive compound stops sperm without affecting hormones

April 20, 2018
A new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE details how a compound called EP055 binds to sperm proteins to significantly slow the overall mobility of the sperm without affecting hormones, making EP055 a potential ...

New research suggests possible link between sudden infant death syndrome and air pollution

April 20, 2018
A study led by the University of Birmingham suggests a possible association between exposure to certain pollutants and an increased risk of so-called 'cot death'.

A dose of empathy may support patients in pain

April 20, 2018
Research published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine suggests that empathic, positive messages from doctors may be of small benefit to patients suffering from pain, and improve their satisfaction about the care ...

For heavy lifting, use exoskeletons with caution

April 20, 2018
You can wear an exoskeleton, but it won't turn you into a superhero.

New device to help patients with rare disease access life-saving treatment

April 19, 2018
Patients with a rare medical condition can receive life-saving treatment at the touch of a button thanks to a new device developed by scientists.

Age affects how we predict and respond to stress at home

April 19, 2018
A recent study finds that older adults are better than younger adults at anticipating stressful events at home - but older adults are not as good at using those predictions to reduce the adverse impacts of the stress.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.