Better sleep for better weight loss

June 19, 2017 by Regina Boyle Wheeler, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—Did you know that the key to your "dream diet" may be as close as your bedroom?

Along with cutting calories and adding , getting enough sleep is important to fight . Sure, you can't eat if you're asleep. But there's more to it than that.

Studies show that sleep increases the hormone that stimulates the appetite and lowers the one that tells your brain you're satisfied. So, sleepy people really may feel more hunger than those who are rested, and they tend to reach for comfort foods, too, like those rich in fat and .

Most adults should get at least seven hours of sleep a night, with some people needing up to nine, according to the National Sleep Foundation. But, between work, the house, and the kids, how do you "turn off the day" and get more Zzzzzs?

  • Exercise regularly, but do it several hours before hitting the sack so you have time to wind down.
  • Create a tranquil bedtime ritual, like soaking in a warm bath or listening to soothing music.
  • Do, however, avoid having a nightcap since alcohol can interfere with sleep—a mug of would be better.
  • And set the stage: Make your bedroom cool, dark, and comfortable, with no gadgets or electronics of any kind.

Those are some examples of good sleep hygiene, steps that should make it easier to fall asleep and stay asleep.

And remember, getting the rest you need will make you better able to take on the day—and maybe even the scale.

Explore further: Shift work and sleep problems

More information: The National Sleep Foundation has more tips for good sleep.

Related Stories

Shift work and sleep problems

December 27, 2016
Dear Mayo Clinic: I started working a night shift six months ago, and I just can't get enough sleep. I'm having a hard time staying asleep during the day. Most days, I get five hours of sleep or less. What can I do to get ...

Daylight saving time—why some have a hard time making the switch

March 9, 2017
For the most part, adjusting our clocks an hour ahead—as we will do this weekend—comes as good news: it is a welcome change from the long, dark winter.

Video: What you need to know about sleep

March 21, 2016
Dr. Alon Avidan, a professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center, offers these tips for getting better sleep:

Improving sleep in children with ADHD has some lessons for all parents

June 5, 2017
Every evening around the world, parents put their children to bed, hoping they'll go to sleep easily. For most parents that's exactly what happens. But for some kids, sleep does not come easily and evenings are a battle.

Sleep: the great motivator

February 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—If you really want to follow through on your New Year's resolutions, make sure you get enough sleep.

Recommended for you

Study compares athlete and truck driver, identical twins

July 20, 2018
When it comes to being fit, are genes or lifestyle—nature or nurture—more important? Researchers at San Francisco State University, CSU Fullerton and Cal Poly, Pomona removed the nature part of the equation by studying ...

Secondhand smoke causing thousands of still births in developing countries

July 20, 2018
The study reveals that more than 40% of all pregnant women in Pakistan are exposed to secondhand smoke—causing approximately 17,000 still births in a year.

Eating iron-fortified grain improves students' attention, memory

July 18, 2018
Adolescent students in a rural school in India who consumed an iron-biofortified version of the grain pearl millet exhibited improved attention and memory compared to those who consumed conventional pearl millet, according ...

Vaping tied to blood clots—in mice

July 18, 2018
A new study involving mice raises another concern about the danger of e-cigarettes in humans after experiments showed that short-term exposure to the device's vapors appeared to increase the risk of clot formation.

Lowering hospitals' Medicare costs proves difficult

July 18, 2018
A payment system that provides financial incentives for hospitals that reduce health-care costs for Medicare patients did not lower costs as intended, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine ...

People who tan in gyms tan more often, and more addictively, than others, new research shows

July 18, 2018
Gyms are places people go to get healthier. But nearly half the gyms in the U.S. contain a potentially addictive carcinogen—tanning beds, report UConn researchers in the July 18 issue of JAMA Dermatology.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.