Diabetes or its precursor affects 100 million Americans

July 19, 2017
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Almost one-third of the US population—100 million people—either has diabetes or its precursor condition, known as pre-diabetes, said a government report Tuesday.

Diabetes is a serious disease that doubles the risk of . Complications can include blindness, , stroke, and amputation of fingers, toes and limbs.

In the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Diabetes Statistics Report, released about every two years, the agency described diabetes as a "growing health problem" that was the seventh leading cause of death in the US in 2015.

That year alone, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among people ages 18 and older, it said.

"Consistent with previous trends, our research shows that diabetes cases are still increasing, although not as quickly as in previous years," said Ann Albright, director of the CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation.

A total of 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes, accounting for 9.4 percent of the population.

Another 84.1 million—about one in three people—have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years.

People with prediabetes have higher than , but not quite to the threshold of being type 2 diabetes.

However, doctors say that damage to the heart, blood vessels and kidneys may already be starting.

Another troubling statistic unearthed by the report showed many people are unaware of their condition.

"Nearly one in four adults living with diabetes—7.2 million Americans—didn't know they had the condition," it said.

A full 88 percent of adults with prediabetes did not know they had it.

The most common form of diabetes, known as Type 2, can often be managed through exercise, diet, and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control .

Type 1 diabetes arises when the body simply doesn't make enough insulin, and there is no known way to prevent it.

"Although these findings reveal some progress in and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes," said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald.

"Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease."

The report found that 25 percent of people aged 65 and older had diabetes, making seniors by far the most affected age group.

Diagnoses of diabetes were highest among American Indians/Alaska Natives (15.1 percent), African-Americans (12.7 percent), and Hispanics (12.1 percent).

The rate among Asians was eight percent, and non-Hispanic whites was 7.4 percent.

Geographically, the highest rates of were found in the American south and Appalachian areas.

Explore further: High prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes in China

Related Stories

High prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes in China

June 27, 2017
A large, nationally representative survey in 2013 of adults in China finds that the estimated overall prevalence of diabetes was about 11 percent and that of prediabetes was nearly 36 percent, according to a study published ...

Millions on verge of diabetes don't know it, CDC reports

March 21, 2013
(HealthDay)—Only 11 percent of the estimated 79 million Americans who are at risk for diabetes know they are at risk, federal health officials reported Thursday.

U.S. diabetes cases jump to 29 million: CDC

June 10, 2014
(HealthDay)—The number of Americans with diabetes rose from 26 million in 2010 to 29 million—9 percent of the population—in 2012, a new federal government study finds.

Check your risk for diabetes, CDC urges

January 21, 2016
(HealthDay)—No one is excused from diabetes. That's the message behind a new public education campaign targeting the 86 million American adults with what's known as prediabetes.

Economic benefit for lifestyle modification in prediabetes

March 15, 2017
(HealthDay)—For individuals with prediabetes, participation in lifestyle modifications such as the National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is associated with economic benefit, according to a study published online Feb. ...

Estimated prevalence of diabetes among adolescents higher than previously reported

July 19, 2016
In a study appearing in the July 19 issue of JAMA, Andy Menke, Ph.D., of Social & Scientific Systems, Silver Spring, Md., and colleagues estimated the prevalence of diabetes among U.S. adolescents, the percentage of those ...

Recommended for you

BCG vaccine leads to long-term blood sugar improvement in type 1 diabetes patients

June 21, 2018
Long-term follow-up of participants in clinical trials of a generic vaccine to reverse advanced type 1 diabetes finds significant clinical benefits, including restoration of near-normal blood sugar levels. Three years after ...

Diagnosing diabetes from a single blood sample

June 18, 2018
Diagnosing type 2 diabetes in clinical practice may require only a single blood sample, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Lentils significantly reduce blood glucose levels, study reveals

June 13, 2018
Replacing potatoes or rice with pulses can lower your blood glucose levels by more than 20 per cent, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study.

Is there a link between diabetes and Parkinson's disease?

June 13, 2018
People with type 2 diabetes may have an increased risk of having a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease later in life, according to a large study published in the June 13, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal ...

Double-checking diabetes medications may reduce re-hospitalizations

June 11, 2018
Clinicians may take upwards of 15 minutes to double-check a patient's medication list in an electronic health record system, but according to a new study, this reconciliation process may be well worth the time for diabetes ...

How a gene linked to obesity could provide new insights into diabetes

June 8, 2018
A gene previously linked with obesity has been found to affect how the body processes insulin, with potential implications for some forms of diabetes.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.