News tagged with blood sugar

Related topics: diabetes · type 2 diabetes · blood sugar levels · insulin · type 1 diabetes

The benefits of simply moving more

(HealthDay)—The link between exercise and good health is a strong one. Still, many people—particularly older adults—find it difficult to take part in formal exercises, and become less physically active over time.

44 minutes ago
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When it comes to exercise, quality trumps quantity

(HealthDay)—You've probably heard that you need to get at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise every week. But a study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology suggests that a mix of different types of exercise ...

Sep 23, 2017
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Blood sugar

Blood sugar concentration, or glucose level, refers to the amount of glucose present in the blood of a human or animal. Normally, in mammals the blood glucose level is maintained at a reference range between about 3.6 and 5.8 mM (mmol/l). It is tightly regulated as a part of metabolic homeostasis.

Mean normal blood glucose levels in humans are about 90 mg/100ml, equivalent to 5mM (mmol/l) (since the molecular weight of glucose, C6H12O6, is about 180 g/mol). The total amount of glucose normally in circulating human blood is therefore about 3.3 to 7g (assuming an ordinary adult blood volume of 5 litres, plausible for an average adult male). Glucose levels rise after meals for an hour or two by a few grams and are usually lowest in the morning, before the first meal of the day. Transported via the bloodstream from the intestines or liver to body cells, Glucose is the primary source of energy for body's cells, fats and oils (ie, lipids) being primarily a compact energy store.

Failure to maintain blood glucose in the normal range leads to conditions of persistently high (hyperglycemia) or low (hypoglycemia) blood sugar. Diabetes mellitus, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia from any of several causes, is the most prominent disease related to failure of blood sugar regulation.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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