Fetal membranes may help transform regenerative medicine

August 30, 2017, Wiley

A new review looks at the potential of fetal membranes, which make up the amniotic sac surrounding the fetus during pregnancy, for regenerative medicine.

Fetal membranes have been used as biological bandages for as well as for serious burns. They may also have numerous other applications because they contain a variety of , which might be used to treat cardiovascular and neurological diseases, diabetes, and other medical conditions.

"The fetal membranes have been used successfully in medical applications for over a century, but we continue to discover new properties of these membranes," said Dr. Rebecca Lim, author of the STEM CELLS Translational Medicine review. "The stem cell populations arising from the are plentiful and diverse, while the membrane itself serves as a unique biocompatible scaffold for bioengineering applications."

Explore further: Stem cell research could prevent premature births

More information: Rebecca Lim. Concise Review: Fetal Membranes in Regenerative Medicine: New Tricks from an Old Dog?, STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (2017). DOI: 10.1002/sctm.16-0447

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