Recurrence of prostate cancer could be reduced thanks to exciting new discovery

September 5, 2017, University of Surrey
Micrograph showing prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma (the most common form of prostate cancer) Credit: Wikipedia

Ground breaking research could reduce the recurrence of prostate cancer in males, a new study in the journal Nature Communications reports.

During this in depth study, an international team of researchers led by British scientists investigated the impact of anti-hormone therapy on samples taken from patients with .

Anti-hormone therapy is a commonly prescribed treatment for cancer of the prostate, which helps to reduce the levels of male hormones - that stimulate cancer cells to grow - in the gland.

Researchers discovered that an inadvertent consequence of anti-hormone therapy treatment is the activation of the DNA repair enzyme, PARP.

The triggering of PARP enables cancer cells to withstand anti-hormone therapy treatment, causing cells to cultivate and develop into a more aggressive form.

To be effective and reduce recurrence of cancer in the prostate, researchers found that prescribing PARP inhibitors, a drug commonly used in breast cancer, alongside anti-hormone therapy treatment may benefit men with prostate cancer. PARP inhibitors prevent DNA repair causing to die rather than repair.

Lead author Dr Mohammad Asim from the University of Surrey, said:

"Prostate cancer is a devastating illness with a high death rate. Our exciting discovery will help remedy this and increase chances of survival for the thousands of men who contract the disease every year.

"Our research shows that anti-hormone treatment could be combined with PARP inhibitor to prevent the progression of the disease."

Dr Catherine Pickworth from Cancer Research UK, said: "This early stage study adds to the growing evidence that some men with prostate cancer could benefit from being given PARP inhibitors alongside hormone deprivation treatment.

"The next step is to carry out clinical trials to test if this combination is safe to use in patients and if it helps more men survive the disease."

Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in males with over 40,000 cases reported every year in the UK with 25 per cent of cases resulting in death. Latest figures from Prostate Cancer UK has found that 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime showing the widespread prevalence of the disease.

This exciting new discovery offers hope to thousands of males and will limit the recurrence of .

Explore further: A gene defect as a potential gateway for targeted prostate cancer therapy

More information: Mohammad Asim et al, Synthetic lethality between androgen receptor signalling and the PARP pathway in prostate cancer, Nature Communications (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-00393-y

Related Stories

A gene defect as a potential gateway for targeted prostate cancer therapy

September 5, 2016
The loss of CHD1, one of the most frequently mutated genes in prostate tumors, sensitizes human prostate cancer cells to different drugs, including PARP inhibitors. This suggests CHD1 as a potential biomarker for targeted ...

Adding abiraterone to standard treatment improves prostate cancer survival by 40 percent

June 3, 2017
Adding abiraterone to hormone therapy at the start of treatment for prostate cancer improves survival by 37 per cent, according to the results of one of the largest ever clinical trials for prostate cancer presented at the ...

Study uncovers an additional strategy for targeting treatment-resistant prostate cancer

May 2, 2017
Prostate cancer cells depend on signaling through the androgen receptor (AR) to grow and survive. Many anti-cancer therapies that target ARs are initially successful in patients, including a class of drugs known as CYP17A1 ...

Synthetic plant hormones shut down DNA repair in cancer cells

February 16, 2016
Two drugs that mimic a common plant hormone effectively cause DNA damage and turn off a major DNA repair mechanism, suggesting their potential use as an anti-cancer therapy, say investigators at Georgetown University Medical ...

New treatment regimen extends life for some men with recurrent prostate cancer, study finds

February 1, 2017
Adding hormonal therapy to radiation treatment can significantly improve the average long-term survival of men with prostate cancer who have had their prostate gland removed, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study published ...

Markers for prostate cancer death can identify men in need of more aggressive treatment

January 12, 2017
Prostate cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of male cancer death in the United States with an estimated 26,000 deaths in 2016. Two-thirds of all PC deaths observed in the US are men with localized disease who developed ...

Recommended for you

Survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma face high long-term risk of solid cancers

December 17, 2018
New research refines existing evidence that survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma face an elevated risk of developing various types of solid tumors many years later. In addition, certain subgroups of patients have an especially ...

Treatment shown to improve the odds against bone marrow cancer

December 15, 2018
Hope has emerged for patients with a serious type of bone marrow cancer as new research into a therapeutic drug has revealed improved outcomes and survival rates.

Immunotherapy combo not approved for advanced kidney cancer patients on the NHS

December 14, 2018
People with a certain type of advanced kidney cancer will not be able to have a combination of two immunotherapy drugs on the NHS in England.

New drug seeks receptors in sarcoma cells, attacks tumors in animal trials

December 13, 2018
A new compound that targets a receptor within sarcoma cancer cells shrank tumors and hampered their ability to spread in mice and pigs, a study from researchers at the University of Illinois reports.

Surgery unnecessary for many prostate cancer patients

December 13, 2018
Otherwise healthy men with advanced prostate cancer may benefit greatly from surgery, but many with this diagnosis have no need for it. These conclusions were reached by researchers after following a large group of Scandinavian ...

Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

December 12, 2018
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth—this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.