Traditional flu tests not as accurate as newer tests

September 8, 2017

(HealthDay)—Digital immunoassays (DIAs) and rapid nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have higher sensitivities for detecting influenza than rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs), according to a review published online Sept. 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Joanna Merckx, M.D., from McGill University in Canada, and colleagues compared the accuracy of traditional RIDTs, DIAs, and rapid NAATs in children and adults with suspected influenza. They extracted date from 162 studies (130 of RIDTs, 19 of DIAs, and 13 of NAATs).

The researchers found that the pooled sensitivities for detecting influenza A using Bayesian bivariate random-effects models were 54.4 percent for RIDTs, 80 percent for DIAs, and 91.6 percent for NAATs. For detecting influenza B, the pooled sensitivities were 53.2 percent for RIDTs, 76.8 percent for DIAs, and 95.4 percent for NAATs. Pooled specificities were consistently high (>98 percent). Based on 46 influenza A and 24 influenza B studies with pediatric-specific data and 35 influenza A and 16 influenza B studies with adult-specific data, pooled sensitivities were higher in children by 12.1 to 31.8 percentage points, with the exception of influenza A detected by rapid NAATs (2.7 percentage points). Industry-sponsored studies had higher pooled sensitivities by 6.2 to 34 percentage points.

"Novel DIAs and rapid NAATs had markedly higher sensitivities for A and B in both children and adults than did traditional RIDTs, with equally high specificities," conclude the authors.

Several authors report financial ties to the diagnostics industry, including BD Diagnostic Systems, which provided funding for the study.

Explore further: Live attenuated flu vaccine not effective for children in 2015-16

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Live attenuated flu vaccine not effective for children in 2015-16

August 10, 2017
(HealthDay)—During the 2015 to 2016 season, influenza vaccines reduced the risk of influenza illness, but the live attenuated vaccine was ineffective among children 2 to 17 years of age, according to a study published in ...

How accurate are rapid flu tests? New research could lead to more timely diagnosis

February 27, 2012
A new study conducted by researchers from McGill University, the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC), and Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, has put the accuracy ...

Flu vaccine rates for kids may drop when the nasal spray vaccine is unavailable

August 24, 2017
Influenza vaccination rates in children may have decreased for the 2016-17 influenza season because of a recommendation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that the nasal spray version of the vaccine not ...

Rapid testing to diagnose influenza leads to more appropriate care in the ED

November 14, 2013
When patients in the emergency department (ED) are diagnosed with influenza by means of a rapid test, they get fewer unnecessary antibiotics, are prescribed antiviral medications more frequently, and have fewer additional ...

CDC: Influenza vaccine 48 percent effective overall

February 20, 2017
(HealthDay)—This year's influenza vaccine is a fairly good match for the circulating viruses, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality ...

Patients with flu-associated pneumonia less likely to have received flu vaccine

October 5, 2015
Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with influenza-associated pneumonia, compared with those with pneumonia not associated with influenza, had lower odds of having received an influenza ...

Recommended for you

New approach to tracking how deadly 'superbugs' travel could slow their spread

November 22, 2017
Killer bacteria - ones that have out-evolved our best antibiotics—may not go away anytime soon. But a new approach to tracking their spread could eventually give us a fighting chance to keep their death toll down.

Research points to diagnostic test for top cause of liver transplant in kids

November 22, 2017
Biliary atresia is the most common cause of liver transplants for children in the United States. Now researchers report in Science Translational Medicine finding a strong biomarker candidate that could be used for earlier ...

Metabolites altered in chronic kidney disease

November 22, 2017
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 1 in 7 people in the United States, according to the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). These individuals have a very high risk of cardiovascular ...

Rainfall can indicate that mosquito-borne epidemics will occur weeks later

November 22, 2017
A new study demonstrates that outbreaks of mosquito-borne viruses Zika and Chikungunya generally occur about three weeks after heavy rainfall.Researchers also found that Chikungunya will predominate over Zika when both circulate ...

Alcohol consumption and metabolic factors act together to increase the risk of severe liver disease

November 22, 2017
A new study provides insights into the interaction between alcohol consumption and metabolic factors in predicting severe liver disease in the general population. The findings, which are published in Hepatology, indicate ...

Gastric acid suppressant lansoprazole may target tuberculosis

November 21, 2017
A cheap and widely used drug, used to treat conditions such as heartburn, gastritis and ulcers, could work against the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), according to new research from UCL and the London School of Hygiene ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.