Trial compares laparoscopic and open surgeries for pancreatic cancer

September 13, 2017, Wiley
Credit: GEM Hospital

A randomized clinical trial has compared key-hole (laparoscopic) surgery and open surgery in pancreatic cancer patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, or the Whipple procedure.

The procedure is used to treat tumors located in the head of the pancreas and adjacent areas, where approximately 75% of pancreatic cancer tumors occur. In the 64-patient trial, which was carried out at GEM Hospital and Research Center, in India, showed overall complications and pathological outcomes did not differ, but laparoscopy offered reduced blood loss, decreased blood transfusions, fewer wound infections, and shorter hospital stays compared with .

"Major surgeries like cancer operations performed with a laparoscopic approach offer significant advantages to patients," said Prof. Chinnusamy Palanivelu, lead author of the British Journal of Surgery study.

Explore further: MIRO trial: 3-year outcomes favour laparoscopic surgery for oesophageal cancer

More information: C. Palanivelu et al, Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open pancreatoduodenectomy for periampullary tumours, British Journal of Surgery (2017). DOI: 10.1002/bjs.10662

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