Study of breastfeeding difficulties due to obesity informs need for targeted interventions

Typically, within 50 to 72 hours of giving birth, a woman will begin to secrete copious milk in a process called lactogenesis II. Infants of mothers who want to breastfeed but who have delayed lactogenesis II experience excessive weight loss and therefore are at high risk for formula supplementation.

A study led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing's Diane Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition, has found that delayed lactogenesis was more prevalent among women who were obese pre-pregnancy and that excessive gestational weight gain was also associated with a delay in lactogenesis II. The study has been published in the Journal of Human Lactation.

"Because nearly one in four women in the United States begins pregnancy with a (BMI) equal to or greater than 30, the study underscores the need for targeted interventions and support to help these women achieve their personal breastfeeding goals," explains Spatz.


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More information: Irma Preusting et al. Obesity as a Predictor of Delayed Lactogenesis II, Journal of Human Lactation (2017). DOI: 10.1177/0890334417727716
Journal information: Journal of Human Lactation

Citation: Study of breastfeeding difficulties due to obesity informs need for targeted interventions (2017, October 18) retrieved 17 January 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-10-breastfeeding-difficulties-due-obesity-interventions.html
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