High sustained response rate for glecaprevir, pibrentasvir in HCV

October 12, 2017

(HealthDay)—For patients with stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, 12 weeks of treatment with glecaprevir and pibrentasvir results in a high rate of sustained virologic response, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Edward Gane, M.D., from Auckland City Hospital in New Zealand, and colleagues conducted a multicenter trial to examine the efficacy and safety of combination treatment with the NS3/4A protease inhibitor glecaprevir and the NS5A inhibitor pibrentasvir for 12 weeks in adults with HCV infection and compensated liver disease with severe renal impairment, dependence on dialysis, or both. Participants had stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease. One hundred four patients were enrolled in the trial.

The researchers found that the sustained virologic response rate was 98 percent. During treatment, none of the patients had virologic failure, and none had a virologic relapse after the end of treatment. Pruritus, fatigue, and nausea were reported in at least 10 percent of the patients. Twenty-four percent of the patients reported serious adverse events. Because of , four patients discontinued the trial treatment prematurely; three of these had sustained virologic response.

"Treatment with glecaprevir and pibrentasvir for 12 weeks resulted in a high rate of sustained virologic response in patients with stage 4 or 5 and HCV infection," the authors write.

The study was funded by AbbVie.

Explore further: Study demonstrates the efficacy of an investigational treatment in hepatitis C subgroup

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