Three new lung cancer genetic biomarkers are identified in Dartmouth study

October 26, 2017

Both environmental and genetic risk factors contribute to development of lung cancer. Tobacco smoking is the most well-known environmental risk factor associated with lung cancer. A Dartmouth research team led by Yafang Li, PhD, has conducted a study to display that gene-smoking interactions play important roles in the etiology of lung cancer.

In their study, three novel SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms), or variations in our DNA that underlie our susceptibility to developing disease, were identified in the interaction analysis, including two SNPs for non-small cell lung cancer risk and one SNP for squamous cell lung cancer risk. The three identified novel SNPs provide potential candidate biomarkers for lung cancer risk screening and intervention. The team's findings, "Genome-wide interaction study of smoking behavior and non-small cell lung cancer risk in Caucasian population," have been published in Carcinogenesis.

The and phenotype data used in this analysis came from OncoArray Consortium. "Genome-wide interaction scanning remains a challenge as most genome-wide association studies are designed for main effect association analysis and have limited power for interaction analysis," said Li. "This study is by far the largest genome-wide SNP-smoking interaction analysis reported for lung cancer. We also adopted a two-step strategy in the analysis to reduce the power loss from ordinary gene-environment interaction analysis."

The three SNPs, identified in the team's study, stratify lung cancer risk by smoking behavior. These three SNPs can be potential biomarkers used to improve the precision to which researchers can categorize an individual's risk of cancer disease by smoking behavior, which are helpful for individualized prognosis and prediction of treatment plan.

While this reported study was restricted to a Caucasian population and the results may not be generalized to other ethnicities because of the different genetic backgrounds, the team aims to further test the identified interaction effect using genotype from other populations. "The limited overlap between discovery genotype and replication genotype may have reduced the power in our validation study," says Li. "We believe as more genotype data becomes available in the future we can discover more important gene-smoking interaction in disease."

Explore further: Largest genome-wide study of lung cancer susceptibility identifies new causes

More information: Yafang Li et al, Genome-wide interaction study of smoking behavior and non-small cell lung cancer risk in Caucasian population, Carcinogenesis (2017). DOI: 10.1093/carcin/bgx113

Related Stories

Largest genome-wide study of lung cancer susceptibility identifies new causes

June 13, 2017
Using the OncoArray genotyping platform developed by multiple cancer consortia, a recent large aggregated genomewide association study identifies new susceptibility loci for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer mortality ...

Potential new asthma genes ID'd in genome-wide study

July 28, 2016
(HealthDay)—Potential new asthma genes have been identified in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) combined with subsequent lung expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis, according to research published online ...

Gene variant linked with reduced lung cancer risk

October 8, 2012
A variant in a gene involved with inflammation and the immune response is linked with a decreased risk of lung cancer. That is the finding of an analysis published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American ...

Genetic variants, tobacco exposure and lung cancer risk

April 25, 2012
There is an association between the rs1051730-rs16969968 genotype and objective measures of tobacco exposure, which indicates that lung cancer risk is largely, if not entirely, mediated by level of tobacco exposure, according ...

Recommended for you

Study prompts new ideas on cancers' origins

December 16, 2017
Rapidly dividing, yet aberrant stem cells are a major source of cancer. But a new study suggests that mature cells also play a key role in initiating cancer—a finding that could upend the way scientists think about the ...

What does hair loss have to teach us about cancer metastasis?

December 15, 2017
Understanding how cancer cells are able to metastasize—migrate from the primary tumor to distant sites in the body—and developing therapies to inhibit this process are the focus of many laboratories around the country. ...

Cancer immunotherapy may work better in patients with specific genes

December 15, 2017
Cancer cells arise when DNA is mutated, and these cells should be recognized as "foreign" by the immune system. However, cancer cells have found ways to evade detection by the immune system.

Scientists pinpoint gene to blame for poorer survival rate in early-onset breast cancer patients

December 15, 2017
A new study led by scientists at the University of Southampton has found that inherited variation in a particular gene may be to blame for the lower survival rate of patients diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer.

Scientists unlock structure of mTOR, a key cancer cell signaling protein

December 14, 2017
Researchers in the Sloan Kettering Institute have solved the structure of an important signaling molecule in cancer cells. They used a new technology called cryo-EM to visualize the structure in three dimensions. The detailed ...

'Bet hedging' explains the efficacy of many combination cancer therapies

December 14, 2017
The efficacy of many FDA-approved cancer drug combinations is not due to synergistic interactions between drugs, but rather to a form of "bet hedging," according to a new study published by Harvard Medical School researchers ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.