Tattoo pigment hypersensitivity can mimic lymphoma

October 3, 2017

(HealthDay)—Tattoo pigment hypersensitivity causing widespread lymphadenopathy has been described in a case report published online Oct. 2 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Jad Othman, M.B.B.S., from the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Australia, and colleagues described the case of a 30-year-old woman reporting a two-week history of bilateral axillary lumps noted on self-examination without fever, night sweats, weight loss, or pulmonary symptoms. She had a large covering her back that had been present for 15 years and another on her left shoulder that was 2.5 years old.

The researchers found that the results of all blood tests were within normal ranges, with a mildly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Multiple enlarged in the axillary, hilar, and mediastinal areas were seen on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). These findings were interpreted as consistent with lymphoma. After nondiagnostic fine-needle aspiration, an enlarged black node was found in excisional biopsy of a left axillary lymph node. The nodal architecture was replaced by well-formed epithelioid granulomas and scattered multinucleate giant cells. Within the paracortex there were collections of black pigment-laden macrophages. The diagnosis was determined to be granulomatous lymphadenitis, which was probably a hypersensitivity reaction to the tattoo pigment.

"To the best of our knowledge, the PET-CT findings of markedly glucose-avid nodes in multiple areas have not previously been described," the authors write. "We believe that this case highlights the importance of a careful tattoo history and physical examination."

Explore further: Endoscopic evaluation advised in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Endoscopic evaluation advised in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

September 1, 2015
(HealthDay)—For elderly adults diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, endoscopic evaluation may be recommended even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a letter to the editor published in the August ...

Breast cancer patients with positive ultrasound guided axillary node biopsy need dissection

May 3, 2012
Contrary to a trend in treatment, breast cancer patients with suspicious lymph nodes should have an ultrasound-guided axillary node biopsy, and if that biopsy is positive these patients should undergo an axillary dissection, ...

Sentinel lymph node dissection non-inferior to axillary node

September 13, 2017
(HealthDay)—Ten-year overall survival for primary breast cancer patients treated with sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) alone is similar to that seen in those treated with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), according ...

Tattoos can mimic metastasis on PET-CT in cervical cancer

June 14, 2015
(HealthDay)—For patients with cervical cancer, extensive tattoos could mimic metastasis on positron emission tomography (PET) fused with computed tomography (CT) imaging, according to a case report published online June ...

Some breast cancer patients on neoadjuvant chemo may avoid axillary lymph node dissection

December 7, 2016
A sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) during surgery that showed no signs of cancer was associated with a low risk for breast cancer recurrence in the axillary (armpit) lymph nodes for patients with large, operable breast tumors ...

Recommended for you

CAR-T immunotherapy may help blood cancer patients who don't respond to standard treatments

October 20, 2017
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of the first centers nationwide to offer a new immunotherapy that targets certain blood cancers. Newly approved ...

Researchers pinpoint causes for spike in breast cancer genetic testing

October 20, 2017
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University ...

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer

October 19, 2017
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels ...

Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack

October 19, 2017
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body's immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease.

One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

October 19, 2017
For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger ...

Researchers target undruggable cancers

October 19, 2017
A new approach to targeting key cancer-linked proteins, thought to be 'undruggable," has been discovered through an alliance between industry and academia.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.