Tracking calories has never been easier

October 27, 2017 by Julie Davis, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—Gone are the days of hunting through calorie and carbohydrate counting books to find the information you need to plan weight loss menus.

Now all that and more is in the palm of your hand—if you have the right smartphone app, that is.

There are hundreds of apps for dieters, many of them free. How can you sort through the choices? Look for the apps with the kind of tools you need.

If you're counting calories, make sure the app lists the widest variety of foods in the widest variety of measurements—cups and ounces as well as grams. Because cutting back on fat calories helps with and , look for an app that breaks down the saturated, unsaturated and in common foods. Some apps also keep track of most , from vitamin C to calcium.

Many apps have built-in motivation. You might want a daily diet tip to stay on track or a digital diary to record and keep a running total of calories eaten every day. There are even apps for following special diets, like tracking carbs and blood sugar for those with diabetes, apps with low-calorie recipes, and apps that let you scan packaged foods at the supermarket to get instant feedback on whether they're good for you.

Since many apps are free, have fun experimenting until you find the one you like best. One caution: Even the best app can't physically stop you from eating, so consider it just one part, however helpful, of your plan to lose weight.

Explore further: Diet journaling made easier

More information: For more details on apps, check out AARP's 2017 list of calorie-counting apps.

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thomasct
2 / 5 (1) Oct 27, 2017
Otdated, erroneous mis-info. Calories DON'T count! In early 1970s Drs. Robert Atkins, MD. and Richard Passwater, PhD. & authors of Human Physiology,, Vander, MD. and Sherman and Luciano PhDs. exposed the faulty calories theory, showing it's the carbs that fatten. Digested carbs 1st top-up muscle and liver glycogen, stored sugar. The rest is rapidly converted to body fat in the cells' mitochondria. Digested fat only slowly converts to usable energy in the liver. Fructose converts directly to body-fat in the liver, HFCS massively accelerates fat gain, MSG and Aspartame also causes.

Homeostasis mechanisms speed or slow metabolic rate, MR, depending on what, when and how much is eaten. One such mechanism, thermic effect is bone structure dependent, where a light-boned 'ectomorph' can quaff down a half gallon of heavily sugared, high HFCS ice-cream and.. weighs the same next day, high thermic effect. Calories? No-where in the game. Cont.
thomasct
3 / 5 (1) Oct 27, 2017
cont. Eating low calorie.. therefore low-fat creates 3 problems. Low fat meals speed stomach emptying by 100%, (fats need100%) longer to digest. That leaves the dieter hungry soon after a meal, then they eat.. more fattening carbs. Artery-protective nutrients in all high fat foods are lost resulting in accelerated heart disease and stroke. A low fat diet causes unused bile salts, (needed to digest fat), to crystallize in the gall bladder, forming very sharp, extemely painful 'stones' needing surgical gall bladder removal. 600K in the US every year have had their gall bladders removed from following idiotic low-cal/lo fat diets!

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