Amount or intensity? Study examines potential benefits of exercise for patients with heart failure

December 6, 2017, Wiley

Physical activity can benefit patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, a common condition with no pharmacological treatment, but no clear recommendations exist on the optimal amount or intensity of physical activity for these patients.

A new ESC Heart Failure study found that a higher amount of is related to higher sub-maximal and physical dimensions of quality of life; however, only high-intensity exercise is associated with maximal exercise capacity.

The study used the 6 minute walking test to assess sub-maximal exercise capacity. The distance covered over a time of 6 minutes is used as the outcome by which to compare changes in exercise capacity.

Peak oxygen uptake was used to assess maximal exercise capacity, explained senior author Prof. Frank Edelmann, of Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, in Germany.

Explore further: Strong evidence of the benefits of exercise therapy in chronic diseases

More information: ESC Heart Failure, DOI: 10.1002/ehf.12227

Related Stories

Strong evidence of the benefits of exercise therapy in chronic diseases

May 22, 2017
There is strong evidence of that aerobic exercise, strength training and condition-specific therapeutic exercise affect positively on the functional capacity of patients with chronic diseases. This is revealed in an extensive ...

Nordic walking improves health of heart failure patients

May 21, 2012
Nordic walking enables heart failure patients to exercise more intensely than walking without poles.

Perception of exertion during exercise an accurate, useful tool

September 10, 2012
When it comes to exercise, our brain's sense of effort can be as good a measure of effectiveness as a heart monitor, according to research undertaken by University of South Australia Professor Roger Eston.

Long-term use of medication does not improve symptoms for heart failure patients

February 26, 2013
Among patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, long-term treatment with the medication spironolactone improved left ventricular diastolic function but did not affect maximal exercise capacity, patient ...

High-dose iron pills do not improve exercise capacity for heart failure

May 16, 2017
Among patients with a certain type of heart failure and iron deficiency, high-dose iron pills did not improve exercise capacity over 16 weeks, according to a study published by JAMA.

Recommended for you

Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researchers achieve important milestone

December 14, 2018
A team of Rutgers scientists, including Leonard Lee and Shaohua Li, have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves—a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart ...

Higher risk of heart attack on Christmas Eve

December 12, 2018
The risk of heart attack peaks at around 10pm on Christmas Eve, particularly for older and sicker people, most likely due to heightened emotional stress, finds a Swedish study in this week's Christmas issue of The BMJ.

Your weight history may predict your heart failure risk

December 12, 2018
In a medical records analysis of information gathered on more than 6,000 people, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that simply asking older adult patients about their weight history at ages 20 and 40 could provide ...

Age is the biggest risk for heart disease, but lifestyle and meds have impact

December 12, 2018
Of all the risk factors for heart disease, age is the strongest predictor of potential trouble.

New understanding of mysterious 'hereditary swelling'

December 12, 2018
For the first time ever, biomedical researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, report cellular defects that lead to a rare disease, hereditary angioedema (HAE), in which patients experience recurrent episodes of swelling ...

Researchers have found that incidence of heart failure was around two-fold higher in people with diabetes

December 11, 2018
Researchers have found that incidence of heart failure was around two-fold higher in people with diabetes.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.