Eating cheese every day might actually be healthy

December 8, 2017 by Ariel Scotti, New York Daily News
Emmental cheese. Credit: Wikipedia

A nibble of cheese a day keeps the heart disease away.

A recent analysis of more than 200,000 people showed that those who ate a little bit of every day were less likely to develop compared to those who rarely or never ate it at all. The researchers from China and the Netherlands examined data compiled from 15 previous studies where most of the participants were tracked for at least 10 years.

Overall, those who ate more cheese had a 14 percent lower risk of developing heart and were 10 percent less likely to have a stroke than their cheese-averse peers. But experts warn that the findings were not linear - meaning the study does not advocate eating enormous quantities of cheese. People who seemed to have health benefits from cheese ate about 40 grams a day or, a square the size of a matchbook.

"This is not the same as eating a big slice of cheesy pizza every day," director of aortic surgery at Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dr. Allan Stewart, who was not involved in the study, told Time. "(But the findings were) certainly different from what people might expect."

The dairy product contains healthful ingredients like calcium, protein and probiotics, said the authors of a new study, published in the European Journal of Nutrition. But cheese, like other milk-based products, contains high levels of saturated fat - which can cause high cholesterol and an increased risk of heart disease.

In the study, cheese was only found to have an association with lowered health risks, not a direct cause and effect. The link might be because who eat cheese daily are already healthier or because they have disposable income, the researchers said. But the good might outweigh the bad with cheese.

"Cheese can be high in probiotics, which tend to put you in less of an inflammatory state," Stewart said. "There is some evidence that cheese - as a substitute for milk, for example - may actually have a protective effect on the . No one's saying you should definitely go out and eat 40 grams of cheese a day. But on the upside, a bit of cheese on a cracker doesn't sound unreasonable."

Explore further: Eating lots of cheese does not raise cholesterol, study shows

Related Stories

Eating lots of cheese does not raise cholesterol, study shows

March 14, 2017
Irish people who eat a lot of cheese do not have higher cholesterol levels than those who don't, according to research carried out at University College Dublin.

Video: The science of the perfect grilled cheese sandwich

November 3, 2015
There's nothing like a gooey, melty, delicious grilled cheese sandwich. But with hundreds of varieties of cheese, how can you make the perfect one? Chemistry to the rescue! This week's Reactions looks at the chemistry of ...

Study reveals cheese is as addictive as drugs

October 27, 2015
For years you've been telling your friends, family, co-workers and anyone who will listen that you're addicted to cheese. It's a part of every meal or snack, and you think about it constantly. According to a new study from ...

Recommended for you

Self-lubricating latex could boost condom use: study

October 17, 2018
A perpetually unctuous, self-lubricating latex developed by a team of scientists in Boston could boost the use of condoms, they reported Wednesday in the journal Royal Society Open Science.

How healthy will we be in 2040?

October 17, 2018
A new scientific study of forecasts and alternative scenarios for life expectancy and major causes of death in 2040 shows all countries are likely to experience at least a slight increase in lifespans. In contrast, one scenario ...

Study finds evidence of intergenerational transmission of trauma among ex-POWs from the Civil War

October 16, 2018
A trio of researchers affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research has found evidence that suggests men who were traumatized while POWs during the U.S. Civil War transmitted that trauma to their offspring—many ...

Father's nicotine use can cause cognitive problems in children and grandchildren

October 16, 2018
A father's exposure to nicotine may cause cognitive deficits in his children and even grandchildren, according to a study in mice publishing on October 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Pradeep Bhide of Florida ...

Many supplements contain unapproved, dangerous ingredients: study

October 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—U.S. health officials have issued more than 700 warnings during the last decade about the sale of dietary supplements that contain unapproved and potentially dangerous drug ingredients, new research reveals.

Age at which women experience their first period is linked to their sons' age at puberty

October 12, 2018
The age at which young women experience their first menstrual bleeding is linked to the age at which their sons start puberty, according to the largest study to investigate this association in both sons and daughters.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.