Traumas do not impact job satisfaction

December 11, 2017, Tilburg University

Each year about a quarter of all workers will be confronted potentially traumatic events, such as crime, accidents, serious illness or death of a significant other. Part of the affected workers will develop very severe posttraumatic stress symptoms. However, in contrast to our expectations these events and symptoms do not have a negative impact on job satisfaction.

Their job satisfaction compared to non-affected workers is not lower or higher, showing that affected workers are resilient in other domains of life. Admittedly, part of the affected workers report low post-event levels of job satisfaction but, similar to non-affected workers, they already had low levels before the events.

These are the main outcomes of a new prospective study among about 800 adult workers in the Netherlands, conducted by Tilburg University in cooperation with the University of Pavia (Italy). For the present study, data was extracted from the Longitudinal Internet for the Social Sciences-panel (LISS-panel) based on a traditional random sample of the Dutch population.

Job satisfaction as well as mental health was measured twice over one year. The course of job satisfaction was assessed of workers who were or were not confronted with during that year. Results showed that affected and non-affected workers did not differ in the course of satisfaction. In addition, we assessed to what extent pre-event satisfaction, post-traumatic and coping self-efficacy explained post-event job satisfaction (besides other variables). Findings indicate that post-event job satisfaction is predominantly explained by pre-event satisfaction, and not by trauma.

To the best of our knowledge, this is the first prospective comparative study assessing the impact of traumas in daily life on job satisfaction, using a population based sample. The findings suggest that possible concerns about their impact on and on atmosphere among colleagues could be relaxed somewhat as long as needed support is provided. Furthermore, our study shows that when resilience is defined in term of the absence of problems only, we underestimate the resilience of affected workers.

Explore further: 3 signs you'd be happier with a new job

More information: Peter G. van der Velden et al. Potentially Traumatic Events and Job Satisfaction, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (2017). DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001237

Related Stories

3 signs you'd be happier with a new job

December 1, 2017
(HealthDay)—Everyone has a bad day at work every now and then. But if you often wake up dreading heading to your job, it's time to consider why you're unhappy and if a job switch is the best solution.

Patient perception of provider concern impacts satisfaction

January 17, 2017
(HealthDay)—For patients with chronic pain receiving opioids, provider satisfaction is not associated with functional outcomes; however, patient perception of provider concern impacts perceived satisfaction, according to ...

New study sheds light on life satisfaction and mortality risk in older adults

June 8, 2015
In a study just published by researchers at Chapman University, findings showed that greater life satisfaction in adults older than 50 years of age is related to a reduced risk of mortality. The researchers also found that ...

Conditions tied to clinician dissatisfaction are modifiable

October 20, 2017
(HealthDay)—Modifiable conditions, like chaos, incohesiveness, and lack of communication, contribute to unsatisfying workplaces for clinicians, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

Scribes improve physician satisfaction with no negative effects on patient satisfaction

September 12, 2017
The first randomized controlled trial of scribes finds that they produce significant improvements in physician satisfaction without detracting from patient satisfaction.

Working with a scribe improves physician satisfaction

September 27, 2017
(HealthDay)—Working with a scribe significantly improves physicians' overall satisfaction, satisfaction with chart quality and accuracy, and charting efficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in the Annals ...

Recommended for you

Sugar improves memory in over-60s, helping them work smarter

July 18, 2018
Sugar improves memory in older adults – and makes them more motivated to perform difficult tasks at full capacity – according to new research by the University of Warwick.

Eating iron-fortified grain improves students' attention, memory

July 18, 2018
Adolescent students in a rural school in India who consumed an iron-biofortified version of the grain pearl millet exhibited improved attention and memory compared to those who consumed conventional pearl millet, according ...

Omega 3 supplements have little or no heart or vascular health benefit: review

July 17, 2018
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death.

As we get parched, cognition can easily sputter, dehydration study says

July 17, 2018
Anyone lost in a desert hallucinating mirages knows that extreme dehydration discombobulates the mind. But just two hours of vigorous yard work in the summer sun without drinking fluids could be enough to blunt concentration, ...

Study shows that people most affected by alcohol also most impacted by sleep deprivation

July 17, 2018
A team of researchers from the German Aerospace Center and Forschungszentrum Jülich has found that people who are most susceptible to alcohol intoxication are also most susceptible to cognitive problems due to sleep deprivation. ...

Jury still out on probiotics

July 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Probiotics have become a trendy dietary supplement, with more and more people popping bacteria-laden capsules to try to improve their gut health.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.