Don't let baby weight linger between pregnancies

January 3, 2018 by Julie Davis, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—Gaining too much baby weight is an issue for many pregnant women. What's more, if you don't lose those pounds, they could pose a problem during your next pregnancy, according to a study published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Researchers looked at nearly 8,000 women who had babies two years apart and found that those who didn't get back to their pre-pregnancy weight before they conceived again had more complications during the second pregnancy. These issues ranged from an increased risk for Caesarean sections to and .

According to the American Public Health Association, being overweight or obese also increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, conditions that can threaten a pregnancy. Labor and delivery problems have also been linked to a woman's (BMI). Some studies suggest that overweight or obesity may even affect a woman's ability to breast-feed.

To drop the post-pregnancy baby weight, diet and exercise can be a winning combination. Though motherhood can leave you exhausted, re-booting an exercise program will actually give you more stamina as well as help you regain your pre-pregnancy shape.

One tool to use for motivation is a pedometer. A study published in BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth tracked women who used the wearable device to increase their daily steps by 500 per week in stages—first to 5,000 steps per day and then on to 10,000 steps per day. At the end of 12 weeks, they lost weight, lowered their BMI, and took inches off their waist and hips.

Losing weight is never easy. Use your postpartum doctor visits to ask for more advice that will fit into your lifestyle.

Explore further: Weighing too much or too little when pregnant can be risky

More information: The U.S. National Library of Medicine has ideas for losing weight after pregnancy.

Related Stories

Weighing too much or too little when pregnant can be risky

November 14, 2017
(HealthDay)—For women contemplating having a baby, new research adds to the evidence suggesting that starting a pregnancy at a normal weight is best.

Weight gain between pregnancies linked to increased risk of gestational diabetes

August 1, 2017
The risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increases with increased weight gain between pregnancies, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Linn Sorbye of the University of Bergen, Norway, ...

Women want support managing their weight during pregnancy

November 2, 2017
Australian women want their healthcare providers to actively advise them about weight management during and after pregnancy, a Monash University study reveals.

Lose weight between babies, study suggests

June 3, 2013
The time between pregnancies is a golden window for obese women to lose weight, a Saint Louis University study finds.

Pre-pregnancy obesity increases odds of having overweight children

April 25, 2016
A new Kaiser Permanente study, published in Pediatric Obesity, found that pre-pregnancy obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of the child becoming overweight at age 2. The ...

Overweight? You can scale back weight gain in pregnancy

December 21, 2012
(HealthDay)—Women who are overweight or obese should gain less weight during pregnancy than moms-to-be of normal weight, according to new recommendations by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Recommended for you

Inducing labor at 39 weeks reduces risks of C-section and other complications

April 25, 2018
It's better to induce than to watch and wait. That's the result of a new study published in PLOS ONE.

Prolonged acetaminophen use during pregnancy linked to increased ASD and ADHD risk

April 24, 2018
A study from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem sheds new light on the possible relationship between prolonged use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in childhood.

Though most prolapse surgeries regress over time, symptoms remain improved

April 17, 2018
An estimated one in three women in the U.S. has a pelvic floor disorder, a condition that often develops after bearing children and getting older. These disorders can lead to incontinence, painful intercourse and even the ...

Painkillers in pregnancy may affect baby's future fertility

April 16, 2018
Taking painkillers during pregnancy could affect the fertility of the unborn child in later life, research suggests.

Mom's marijuana winds up in breast milk

April 10, 2018
(HealthDay)—Breast-feeding has known benefits for both baby and mom, but if a new mom also smokes marijuana, does the drug turn up in her breast milk?

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.