Review reveals potential predictors of long-term distress after cancer diagnosis

January 10, 2018, Wiley

A new review of published studies indicates that distress and neuroticism at or within 3 months of cancer diagnosis may predict emotional distress at least 12 months later. In the Psycho-Oncology analysis, there was no consistent evidence that demographic, clinical, or social factors reliably predict long-term distress.

The investigators noted that studies included in the analysis were varied, with different populations and methods. Therefore, additional studies are needed to test and expand the preliminary findings before any conclusions can be reached.

"While the research suggests that levels of distress and neuroticism around the time of diagnosis are useful markers of vulnerability, further prospective research is now needed in order to understand how these variables might be related and to identify the psychological mechanisms by which distress is maintained," said lead author Dr. Sharon Cook, of the University of Liverpool, in the UK.

Explore further: Cancer distress may lead to missed appointments

More information: Psycho-Oncology (2018). DOI: 10.1002/pon.4601

Related Stories

Cancer distress may lead to missed appointments

September 25, 2017
(HealthDay)—Seriously distressed cancer patients appear to miss more appointments and have more hospital admissions during treatment, a new study finds.

Many young cancer patients do not receive adequate fertility information and support

August 21, 2017
All cancer patients of reproductive age should be provided with fertility information and referrals for fertility preservation. A new Psycho-Oncology analysis of the published literature indicates that many cancer patients ...

Educational session helps alleviate distress in prostate cancer patients and their partners

May 19, 2017
In a recent study, an educational session helped alleviate distress equally in both patients with prostate cancer and their partners.

Diabetes-related distress ups risk for rx nonadherence

October 31, 2016
(HealthDay)—Diabetes-related distress and depression symptom severity are risk factors for medication nonadherence in type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Diabetes Care.

Patients undergoing lung cancer screening experience elevated levels of distress

October 19, 2015
Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening is recommended to screen patients with an increased risk of developing lung cancer, but little research regarding the emotional toll of screening has been conducted. ...

Lower socioeconomic status is linked to obesity through distress and emotional eating

May 18, 2017
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Porto, Portugal (17-20 May) shows that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher body-mass index (BMI) through its effects on distress and subsequent ...

Recommended for you

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

January 18, 2018
Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial ...

Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapy

January 18, 2018
Every day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research ...

These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

The pill lowers ovarian cancer risk, even for smokers

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—It's known that use of the birth control pill is tied to lower odds for ovarian cancer, but new research shows the benefit extends to smokers or women who are obese.

Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagus

January 17, 2018
Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise ...

Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being read

January 17, 2018
Scientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted—revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.