Implanted continuous glucose sensor proven safe and accurate in types 1 and 2 diabetes

February 12, 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Results of the PRECISE II study showed the implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system from Eversense to be safe and highly accurate over the 90-day sensor life in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. More than 93% of CGM glucose values were within an acceptable range of reference values, according to the PRECISE II data reported in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics (DTT).

Lynne Kelley, MD, Senseonics, Inc. (Germantown, MD), and a team of clinical researchers from across the United States conducted the prospective, multicenter PRECISE II study. They describe the study design and their findings in the article entitled "A Prospective Multicenter Evaluation of the Accuracy of a Novel Implanted Continuous Glucose Sensor: PRECISE II."

The primary endpoint of the study was the mean absolute relative difference (MARD) between Eversense glucose values and reference measurements (from 40-400 mg/dL) over the 90-day post-insertion period. The researchers showed that clinicians with limited to no surgical experience could safely insert and remove the CGM sensor after appropriate training. Only one serious adverse event was reported related to device use or sensor insertion/removal.

"Continuous monitoring is becoming standard of care especially for insulin-requiring patients with diabetes. Eversense, if approved by the FDA, will become the first implantable CGM system for use lasting at least 3 months," says DTT Editor-in-Chief Satish Garg, MD, Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Denver (Aurora).

Explore further: Implantable continuous glucose monitoring system safe, accurate

More information: Mark P. Christiansen et al, A Prospective Multicenter Evaluation of the Accuracy of a Novel Implanted Continuous Glucose Sensor: PRECISE II, Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics (2018). DOI: 10.1089/dia.2017.0142

Related Stories

Implantable continuous glucose monitoring system safe, accurate

November 14, 2016
(HealthDay)—A new implantable continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system seems to be safe and accurate for diabetes, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in Diabetes Care.

Flash glucose monitoring offers accuracy, ease of use, and clinical benefit for type 1 diabetes

May 30, 2017
Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) sensors are now so accurate that two CGM devices, including the first approved "Flash Glucose Monitoring" system, have received regulatory approval for nonadjunctive use by individuals ...

Recommendations to optimize continuous glucose monitoring in diabetes clinical research

June 2, 2017
The advantages of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for obtaining real-time blood glucose measurements and its ability to detect and even predict hypo- and hyperglycemic events make it a very useful tool for evaluating ...

Clinical efficacy and future development of continuous glucose monitoring highlighted in DTT

June 7, 2017
A growing body of data from clinical studies of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in type 1 diabetes supports the value of CGM for reducing variability in blood glucose levels and the risks of both hypo- and hyperglycemia, ...

New study on reasons for low rates of blood glucose monitoring in type 2 diabetes in China

September 21, 2017
Researchers in China who assessed self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) behavior among nearly 19,000 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with oral medications reported very low SMBG rates both before and after the patients ...

More accurate continuous glucose monitoring systems can reduce frequency of hypoglycemic episodes

June 5, 2015
In silico experiments demonstrate that advanced sensor and software technology that improves the accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) can enable better detection of dangerously low blood sugar and reduced frequency ...

Recommended for you

Deep brain stimulation found to improve diabetes symptoms

May 24, 2018
A team of researchers from several institutions in the Netherlands and Yale University in the U.S. has found evidence that suggests deep brain stimulation (DBS) can help treat type 2 diabetes. In their paper published in ...

Women with pregnancy-related diabetes may be at risk for chronic kidney disease

May 21, 2018
Gestational diabetes may predispose women to early-stage kidney damage, a precursor to chronic kidney disease, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The study appears ...

Diabetes researchers find switch for fatty liver disease

May 17, 2018
Duke researchers have identified a key fork in the road for the way the liver deals with carbohydrates, fats and protein. They say it could be a promising new target for combating the pandemics of fatty liver disease and ...

New study of youth with type 1 diabetes connects 'honeymoon period' with lower LDL cholesterol

May 17, 2018
A new study by UMass Medical School physician-scientist Benjamin U. Nwosu, MD, finds that children with type 1 diabetes who experienced a partial clinical remission, or "honeymoon phase," had significantly lower low-density ...

"Living drug factories" may one day replace injections

May 17, 2018
Patients with diabetes generally rely on constant injections of insulin to control their disease. But MIT spinout Sigilon Therapeutics is developing an implantable, insulin-producing device that may one day make injections ...

Boosting the effects of vitamin D to tackle diabetes

May 10, 2018
More than 27 million people in the United States are living with type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As the population ages and a growing percentage of people become overweight or ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.