Implanted continuous glucose sensor proven safe and accurate in types 1 and 2 diabetes

February 12, 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Results of the PRECISE II study showed the implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system from Eversense to be safe and highly accurate over the 90-day sensor life in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. More than 93% of CGM glucose values were within an acceptable range of reference values, according to the PRECISE II data reported in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics (DTT).

Lynne Kelley, MD, Senseonics, Inc. (Germantown, MD), and a team of clinical researchers from across the United States conducted the prospective, multicenter PRECISE II study. They describe the study design and their findings in the article entitled "A Prospective Multicenter Evaluation of the Accuracy of a Novel Implanted Continuous Glucose Sensor: PRECISE II."

The primary endpoint of the study was the mean absolute relative difference (MARD) between Eversense glucose values and reference measurements (from 40-400 mg/dL) over the 90-day post-insertion period. The researchers showed that clinicians with limited to no surgical experience could safely insert and remove the CGM sensor after appropriate training. Only one serious adverse event was reported related to device use or sensor insertion/removal.

"Continuous monitoring is becoming standard of care especially for insulin-requiring patients with diabetes. Eversense, if approved by the FDA, will become the first implantable CGM system for use lasting at least 3 months," says DTT Editor-in-Chief Satish Garg, MD, Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Denver (Aurora).

Explore further: Implantable continuous glucose monitoring system safe, accurate

More information: Mark P. Christiansen et al, A Prospective Multicenter Evaluation of the Accuracy of a Novel Implanted Continuous Glucose Sensor: PRECISE II, Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics (2018). DOI: 10.1089/dia.2017.0142

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Anonym979840
not rated yet Feb 19, 2018
I had no idea that I had type II diabetes. I was diagnosed at age 50, after complaining to my doctor about being very tired. There is no family history of this disease. I'm a male and at the time of diagnosis, I weighed about 215. (I'm 6'2")Within 6 months, I had gained 30 to 35 pounds, and apparently the diabetes medicines (Actos and Glimiperide) are known to cause weight gain. I wish my doctor had mentioned that, so I could have monitored my weight more closely. I was also taking metformin 1000 mg twice daily December 2017 our family doctor started me on Green House Herbal Clinic Diabetes Disease Herbal mixture, 5 weeks into treatment I improved dramatically. At the end of the full treatment course, the disease is totally under control. No case blurred vision, frequent urination, or weakness
Visit Green House Herbal Clinic official website www. greenhouseherbalclinic .com.

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