Is bariatric surgery for you?

March 8, 2018 by Julie Davis, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—If you've been struggling with your weight for some time, you might be wondering if bariatric surgery is the answer.

This , which involves reducing the size of your stomach to limit how much food you can take in, isn't for moderate weight loss. You need to be at least 100 pounds overweight with a BMI of 40, or 35 if you also have serious health issues. You'll also need to show that you haven't been able to lose weight with other, more conventional approaches.

Checklist: You may be a candidate for bariatric surgery if:

  • You're 100 pounds or more over your ideal weight.
  • Your BMI (body mass index, a ratio of weight to height) is over 40 or is over 35 and you have related to obesity. A person who's 5-feet, 7-inches tall and weighs 260 pounds has a BMI of 40.
  • You've been unable to lose and keep off .

It's important to understand what happens after the surgery. Over the following two years, you're likely to lose between 60 to 80 percent of your excess . At first, you won't have much appetite. When it returns, you'll be satisfied with a lot less food than before, health professionals report.

As part of the decision-making process, explore all the risks and benefits of this life-altering procedure.

Beyond the immediate risks of any surgery, there are risks of infection, as well as vitamin, mineral and even protein deficiencies. This can happen because you're taking in fewer nutrients or your body can't absorb them as well as it used to.

To avoid serious consequences, you'll need to follow specific diet guidelines, take supplements for life, and be monitored with regular blood tests.

While does help many , it's not a magic wand. You have to be ready to commit to making permanent lifestyle and diet changes.

Explore further: Weight-loss surgery alone won't keep the pounds off

More information: The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery has answers to common questions, including certain risks about weight loss surgery.

Related Stories

Weight-loss surgery alone won't keep the pounds off

January 30, 2018
(HealthDay)—If you think your battle against obesity ends on the operating table, you're mistaken.

Patients who achieve short-term weight loss before bariatric surgery have better outcomes

February 2, 2018
For patients undergoing weight loss (bariatric) surgery, losing at least 8 percent of excess weight just one month before the procedure directly impacts their ability to shed even more pounds in the year following surgery, ...

Bariatric surgery prolongs lifespan in obese

January 16, 2018
Obese, middle-age men and women who had bariatric surgery have half the death rate of those who had traditional medical treatment over a 10-year period, reports a study that answers questions about the long-term risk of the ...

Bariatric surgery may reduce heart failure risk

November 14, 2016
Bariatric surgery and other treatments that cause substantial weight loss can significantly reduce the risk of heart failure in obese patients, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's ...

Delaying bariatric surgery until higher weight may result in poorer outcomes

July 26, 2017
Obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery were more like to achieve a body mass index (BMI) of less than 30 one year after surgery if they had a BMI of less than 40 before surgery, according to a study published by JAMA ...

Recommended for you

Muscle relaxants increase risk of respiratory complications

September 18, 2018
Muscle relaxants are a necessary part of anesthesia during certain major operations. However, studies have hinted at respiratory risks connected with these drugs. POPULAR, a major prospective observational European study ...

Liver allocation system disadvantages children awaiting transplants

September 17, 2018
Children are at a considerable disadvantage when competing with adults for livers from deceased organ donors in the U.S. allocation system, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led analysis reveals ...

Gunshot victims require much more blood and are more likely to die than other trauma patients

September 17, 2018
In a new analysis of data submitted to Maryland's state trauma registry from 2005 to 2017, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that gunshot victims are approximately five times more likely to require blood transfusions, ...

Taste preferences connected to success of long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery

September 16, 2018
Following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a type of bariatric surgery, many patients exhibit a reduction in taste preference for sweet and fatty foods, although this effect may only be temporary, according to new research ...

New insights into what drives organ transplant rejection

September 6, 2018
When it comes to transplant rejection, some organs are far trickier than others. Some transplantable organs, such as the liver, are readily accepted by the recipient's immune system, rarely triggering an immune response and ...

Investigators find that bile acids reduce cocaine reward

August 31, 2018
Bile acids—gut compounds that aid in the digestion of dietary fats—reduce the desire for cocaine, according to a new study by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.