CDC: invasive MRSA more likely among injection drug users

June 12, 2018

(HealthDay)—Injection drug users are more than 16-fold more likely to develop invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, according to research published in the June 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Kelly A. Jackson, M.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues examined the effect of the opioid epidemic on invasive MRSA infections during 2005 to 2016 using data from the Emerging Infections Program.

The researchers found that the likelihood of developing invasive MRSA infections was 16.3 times higher for persons who inject drugs versus others. From 2011 to 2016 there was an increase in the proportion of invasive MRSA cases that occurred among persons who inject drugs, from 4.1 to 9.2 percent. The types were often those linked to nonsterile injection drug use.

"Continued increases in nonsterile injection drug use are likely to result in increases in invasive MRSA infections, underscoring the importance of public health measures to curb the ," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Fewer cases of antibiotic-resistant MRSA infection in the US in 2011

More information: Abstract/Full Text

Related Stories

Fewer cases of antibiotic-resistant MRSA infection in the US in 2011

September 16, 2013
An estimated 30,800 fewer invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections occurred in the United States in 2011 compared to 2005, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine by Raymund Dantes, M.D., ...

Study: Superbug MRSA infections less costly, but still deadly

May 15, 2018
Staph infections, whether MRSA (resistant to methicillin) or susceptible, are important and deadly. Drug-resistant staph infections continue to be deadlier than those that are not resistant and treatable with traditional ...

Treatment for MRSA no longer more costly than for susceptible Staph aureus infections

May 10, 2018
A new study from the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP), with collaborators from Johns Hopkins University and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, found that infections caused by one of the ...

Dominant strain of drug-resistant MRSA decreases in hospitals, but persists in community

September 16, 2015
The incidence of the most common strain of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has decreased in hospital-onset cases, but has failed to decline in the broader community, according to new research ...

MRSA colonization in groin tied to clinical infections

March 26, 2013
(HealthDay)—Groin colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) leads to an increased risk of developing active MRSA infection later among HIV-infected patients, according to a study published in the ...

Researcher exposes MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beaches

December 14, 2017
Beachgoers know there is always some risk of disease, but a recent study by a Kent State University researcher shows they may not be aware of all the dangers the beach poses.

Recommended for you

'Game changer' tuberculosis drug cures 9 in 10

October 22, 2018
A new treatment for a drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis can cure more than 90 percent of sufferers, according to a trial hailed Monday as a "game changer" in the fight against the global killer.

AI doctor could boost chance of survival for sepsis patients

October 22, 2018
Scientists have created an artificial intelligence system that could help treat patients with sepsis.

Consuming caffeine from coffee reduces incident rosacea

October 22, 2018
(HealthDay)—Caffeine intake from coffee is inversely associated with the risk for incident rosacea, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Dermatology.

Scientists in Sweden may have figured out one way acne bacteria defies treatment

October 22, 2018
Researchers in Sweden have discovered how acne-causing bacteria feed off their human hosts. The study, which was performed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, could make it possible to find effective ways to treat severe ...

A guide to Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), the rare, polio-like illness making young children sick

October 22, 2018
A fast-acting, polio-like illness has sickened 62 young children, with an average age of 4, in 22 U.S. states so far this fall.

Home-based biofeedback therapy is effective option for tough-to-treat constipation

October 22, 2018
Biofeedback therapy used at home is about 70 percent effective at helping patients learn how to coordinate and relax bowel muscles and relieve one of the most difficult-to-treat types of constipation, investigators report.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.