Infant omega-3 supplementation tied to decreased waist size

June 8, 2018

(HealthDay)—Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) supplementation in infancy is associated with reduced insulin concentrations and insulin resistance in boys and reduced waist circumference in both sexes at age 5 years, according to a study published online June 8 in Pediatrics.

Valene H.L. See, Ph.D., from the Royal Perth Hospital in Australia, and colleagues randomly assigned 420 infants to a daily supplement of n-3 LCPUFA or olive oil (control) from birth to 6 months. Growth, body composition, and cardiometabolic risk factors were evaluated at 5 years of age.

The researchers found that infants who received n-3 LCPUFA had a smaller waist circumference at 5 years (coefficient, 1.1 cm), which remained significant after adjusting for confounders (coefficient, 0.8 cm). Boys who received n-3 LCPUFA supplementation had a 21 percent reduction in concentrations and a 22 percent reduction in versus the control group. At birth, 2.5 years, and 5 years, there were no other differences in growth and cardiometabolic risk factors between the groups.

"Longer-term follow-up of the cohort is warranted to determine whether these differences are maintained into adolescence," write the authors.

Explore further: Fish oil may protect the youngest hearts

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