Addiction nonprofit makes searching for services simple

August 11, 2018 by Rebecca Lurye, The Hartford Courant

Addiction Policy Forum, a national substance abuse nonprofit, has added Connecticut-specific resources to its online database of treatment centers, facilities and healthcare providers.

The Addiction Resource Center, which now has chapters in 26 states, is an interactive database where people can filter services by their geographic and support needs, like type of insurance, medication and facility. By compiling a comprehensive, searchable list of addiction resources, the nonprofit hopes to connect more people with help and reduce overdose rates nationwide.

In Connecticut, for example, a few clicks could tell someone that Silver Hill Hospital in New Canaan is the only Fairfield County service that accepts private insurance for an opioid treatment program; Rushford Center Positive Step in Glastonbury is the only partial-hospitalization program for adolescents in Hartford County; and the Hartford Dispensary in Willimantic is the only methadone clinic in Windham County.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has a similar database, but with fewer filters.

"Connecticut sees an overwhelming amount of people struggling with substance use disorder, and many of these cases result in death," said Ada Haines, chair of the Lebanon-based Connecticut chapter of ARC. "I am hopeful that the ARC database will be able to provide more Connecticut residents with the resources they need to get help so we can save more lives,"

Drug overdoses killed 1,038 people in Connecticut last year, up 13 percent from 2016, according to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. That year had seen an even larger leap in , a 24 percent rise between 2015 and 2016.

"With these new resources added to the ARC database to help Connecticut residents seek help in their moments of crisis, I'm very hopeful that these numbers will go down," said APC president and CEO Jessica Hulsey.

The online is available at www.addictionresourcecenter.org/resources .

The ARC also guides people through a self-assessment tool, and includes a line with information on substance use disorder, treatment options and support. The line is staffed by addiction counselors, licensed social workers and peer advocates.

Connecticut residents can call the line at 1-833-301-HELP (4357), Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Connecticut also has a 24/7 hotline to link individuals to residential detox services. The number, operated by the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, is 1-800-563-4086.

Explore further: Plan to curb opioid overdose crisis helps state, nation

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