Analysis finds HPV vaccine safe

September 19, 2018, Wiley
Electron micrograph of a negatively stained human papilloma virus (HPV) which occurs in human warts. Credit: public domain

Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause certain cancers in women and men, but HPV vaccines are highly effective in preventing infection with oncogenic HPV types. A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology review of post-licensure data did not identify any new or unexpected safety concerns of the bivalent HPV vaccine.

The authors analyzed reports submitted to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting Systems (VAERS) following bivalent HPV vaccination from 2009-2017. While most HPV used in the United States during this period was quadrivalent HPV vaccine, 720,000 doses of bivalent HPV vaccine were distributed. VAERS received 241 adverse event reports after bivalent HPV vaccine; 95.8 percent of reports were classified as non-serious.

The findings should provide reassurance to patients, parents, and healthcare providers.

"Bivalent HPV vaccine is used in more than 134 countries around the world. This review provides additional evidence that bivalent HPV vaccine is safe, and that most adverse reactions are mild and resolve quickly on their own," said lead author Tiffany Suragh, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in Atlanta.

Explore further: No new adverse events reported for DTaP vaccination

More information: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology (2018). DOI: 10.1111/bcp.13736

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