Ovary removal may increase risk of chronic kidney disease

September 19, 2018, Mayo Clinic
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Premenopausal women who have their ovaries surgically removed face an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study published on Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

"This is the first study that has shown an important link between estrogen deprivation in younger women and damage. Women who have their ovaries surgically removed have an increased long-term risk of chronic kidney ," says Walter Rocca, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologist and epidemiologist, and senior author.

Previous research conducted in animals has shown that the female hormone estrogen protectively affects the kidneys. That led Mayo Clinic researchers to wonder how removing both ovaries would affect kidney function in premenopausal women.

Chronic kidney disease, also called chronic kidney failure, means a person's kidneys are damaged and unable to filter blood the way that they should. If an individual's kidney becomes severely damaged and starts to fail, treatment options are limited to dialysis and a kidney transplant. An estimated 30 million adults in the U.S. have chronic kidney disease, and it is the ninth leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

These results highlight the need for physicians to discuss the potential increased risk for chronic kidney disease with women considering having their ovaries removed, according to Dr. Rocca.

"For women who do not have an increased genetic risk for breast and ovarian cancer, we recommend against the removal of the ovaries as a preventive option due to the increased risk of diseases, including chronic kidney disease and the increased risk of death," Dr. Rocca says.

Using the records linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, the study compared 1,653 premenopausal women living in Olmsted County, Minnesota, who had their ovaries surgically removed prior to 50 to an equal number of women of similar ages who did not have their ovaries removed. The women were followed for a median of 14 years. Mayo Clinic researchers found that women who had their ovaries removed had a 6.6 percent higher risk of developing chronic kidney disease, compared to those who did not. The risk of kidney failure was even higher for younger than 46. Those who had their ovaries removed before 46 had a 7.5 percent increased risk of .

Explore further: Ovarian removal to prevent ovarian cancer should not be an option for most premenopausal women, research finds

Related Stories

Ovarian removal to prevent ovarian cancer should not be an option for most premenopausal women, research finds

September 29, 2016
A Mayo Clinic research team has found evidence suggesting that the controversial practice of ovary removal in premenopausal women to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in women who are not at high risk of cancer. ...

Research connects first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease

November 2, 2016
Mayo Clinic nephrologists have uncovered a connection between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease. In a paper published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers announce a persistent decline in ...

Women with pregnancy-related diabetes may be at risk for chronic kidney disease

May 21, 2018
Gestational diabetes may predispose women to early-stage kidney damage, a precursor to chronic kidney disease, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The study appears ...

1 in 7 Americans has kidney disease: CDC

June 9, 2017
(HealthDay)—Thirty million American adults have chronic kidney disease—but many don't know it.

Hormone replacement therapy may benefit the kidneys

November 5, 2015
Hormone replacement therapy may help protect kidney health, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3-8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.

Remaining kidneys of overweight donors less able to adapt to pregnancy

January 19, 2018
Female kidney donors who are overweight may be at a higher risk for preeclampsia during pregnancy, according to a new study. The increased risk is due to a reduction in a type of kidney function called renal functional reserve ...

Recommended for you

Taking the virus out of a mosquito's bite

December 12, 2018
They approach with the telltale sign—a high-pitched whine. It's a warning that you are a mosquito's next meal. But that mosquito might carry a virus, and now the virus is in you. Now, with the help of state-of-the-art technology, ...

Study identifies a key cellular mechanism that triggers pneumonia in humans

December 11, 2018
The relationship between influenza and pneumonia has long been observed by health workers. Its genetic and cellular mechanisms have now been investigated in depth by scientists in a study involving volunteers and conducted ...

Human antibody discovery could save lives from fungal killer

December 11, 2018
A new way to diagnose, treat and protect against stealth fungal infections that claim more than 1.5 million lives per year worldwide has been moved a step closer, according to research published in Nature Communications.

Effect of oral alfacalcidol on clinical outcomes in patients without secondary hyperparathyroidism

December 11, 2018
Treatment with active vitamin D did not decrease cardiovascular events in kidney patients undergoing hemodialysis, according to a research group in Japan. They have reported their research results in the December 11 issue ...

Dialysis patients at risk of progressive brain injury

December 10, 2018
Kidney dialysis can cause short-term 'cerebral stunning' and may be associated with progressive brain injury in those who receive the treatment for many years. For many patients with kidney failure awaiting a kidney transplant ...

Silicosis is on the rise, but is there a therapeutic target?

December 6, 2018
Researchers from the CNRS, the University of Orléans, and the company Artimmune, in collaboration with Turkish clinicians from Atatürk University, have identified a key mechanism of lung inflammation induced by silica exposure, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.