New DNA-based test approved to help verify blood compatibility

October 13, 2018

Credit: CC0 Public Domain
(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the ID CORE XT DNA-based test to help doctors verify blood compatibility before a transfusion.

People who need repeated transfusions, such as those with , are more likely to develop certain antibodies. If blood with poorly-matched antibodies is transfused, the procedure is more likely to lead to red-blood-cell destruction and a transfusion reaction, the agency explained.

"We know that DNA testing holds great promise—to provide more informative, accurate and cost-effective methods that can enhance patient care," said Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

Traditionally, identifying antigens requires use of a called antisera. This method has limitations, and the serum may be difficult to obtain, the FDA said.

The new test is produced by Progenika Biopharma, which is based in Spain.

Explore further: FDA OKs test to improve blood donor-recipient matching

More information: More Information

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