Participation in group prenatal care may improve birth outcomes

October 22, 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

A recent retrospective matched cohort study of more than 9,000 pregnant women found that women who received group prenatal care had a significantly lower risk of having a preterm birth or a low birth weight baby compared with women who received individual care only, after adjusting for number of individual care visits. Women who attended five or more group prenatal care sessions experienced even greater reductions in risk for preterm birth and low birth weight, as reported in an article published in Journal of Women's Health.

Shayna D. Cunningham, Ph.D., and colleagues from Yale School of Public Health (New Haven, CT) and Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Nashville, TN) coauthored the article entitled, "Group Prenatal Care Reduces Risk of Preterm Birth and Low Birth Weight: A Matched Cohort Study." The researchers compared with a live singleton birth who received group prenatal care to a matched sample of women who received individual care only at Vanderbilt University Medical Center from January 2009 through June 2016. For each woman, only the first birth that occurred during the study period was included.

"The findings of this study demonstrate the potential positive impact of group prenatal care attendance on outcomes and the importance of patient adherence," states Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health and Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA. "As noted by the authors, efforts are needed to promote and support widespread adoption of group prenatal care by health systems as well as among patients and providers."

Explore further: Prenatal care in first trimester for majority of 2016 U.S. births

More information: Shayna D. Cunningham et al, Group Prenatal Care Reduces Risk of Preterm Birth and Low Birth Weight: A Matched Cohort Study, Journal of Women's Health (2018). DOI: 10.1089/jwh.2017.6817

Related Stories

Prenatal care in first trimester for majority of 2016 U.S. births

May 31, 2018
(HealthDay)—Overall, 77.1 percent of women who gave birth in 2016 initiated prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy, according to a report published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's May ...

ACA dependent coverage tied to increased prenatal care

February 14, 2018
(HealthDay)—The Affordable Care Act dependent coverage provision is associated with increased early and adequate prenatal care and decreased preterm births, according to a study published in the Feb. 13 issue of the Journal ...

Midwifery linked to lower odds of birth complications for low-income women

October 3, 2018
New research from the University of British Columbia and the University of Saskatchewan is adding new evidence in support of midwives as a safe option for prenatal care, especially for women who have low socioeconomic status.

Mothers-to-be and babies benefit from group prenatal care, study finds

December 21, 2015
Group prenatal care can substantially improve health outcomes for both mothers and their infants, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health has found.

Daily iron during pregnancy linked to improved birth weight

June 20, 2013
Taking iron daily during pregnancy is associated with a significant increase in birth weight and a reduction in risk of low birth weight, finds a study published in BMJ today.

Study finds women with pregnancy-related nausea, vomiting use marijuana more

August 20, 2018
A Kaiser Permanente study, published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that women with mild and severe nausea and vomiting in pregnancy were significantly more likely to have used marijuana during pregnancy than women ...

Recommended for you

Human Cell Atlas study reveals maternal immune system modifications in early pregnancy

November 14, 2018
The first Human Cell Atlas study of early pregnancy in humans has shown how the function of the maternal immune system is affected by cells from the developing placenta. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Newcastle ...

Soy formula feeding during infancy associated with severe menstrual pain in adulthood

November 9, 2018
New research suggests that infant girls fed soy formula are more likely to develop severe menstrual pain as young adults. The finding adds to the growing body of literature that suggests exposure to soy formula during early ...

A major role for a small organ in the immune response during pregnancy

November 9, 2018
The immune system of a pregnant woman is altered during pregnancy, but not in the way previously believed, according to results from a study at Linköping University, Sweden. This study, published in the Journal of Allergy ...

Mailed HPV tests can help find women at-risk for cervical cancer, study finds

November 7, 2018
University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have found that mailing self-collection kits to test for high-risk human papillomavirus infection has the potential to boost cervical cancer ...

Women who give birth to boys much more likely to have postnatal depression

November 6, 2018
A University of Kent study into postnatal depression (PND) found the odds of developing this condition increased by 79% when mothers had baby boys compared to baby girls.

New study takes first step toward treating endometriosis

November 1, 2018
Researchers at Northwestern Medicine have taken the first step in bioengineering the human uterus to treat endometriosis, uterine-factor infertility and endometrial cancer.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.