Skipping breakfast associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death

breakfast
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

New evidence underscores the importance of eating breakfast every day, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that showed skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of death from heart disease.

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1988 to 1994 with an average follow-up of 18 years, researchers collected information from 6,550 participants, 40 to 75 years of age, who had no history of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Participants were asked "How often do you eat breakfast?" and possible answers included, "every day," "some days," "rarely" and "never." Among the participants, 5.1 percent never ate breakfast, 10.9 percent rarely ate breakfast, 25 percent ate breakfast some days and 59 percent ate breakfast every day.

Participants who never consumed breakfast had an 87 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease-specific mortality than those who consumed breakfast every day. Researchers said skipping was associated with changes in appetite and decreased satiety, elevated blood pressure, and harmful changes in lipid levels. It was also a behavioral marker for unhealthy lifestyle habits.


Explore further

Study examines which schoolchildren are most likely to skip breakfast

More information: Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2019). DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2019.01.065
Citation: Skipping breakfast associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death (2019, April 22) retrieved 21 September 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-04-breakfast-cardiovascular-death.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
4 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more