E-cigarettes take toll on heart health

e-cigarette
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E-cigarette use takes a toll on heart health—a big concern given the high prevalence of e-cigarettes and perception of e-cigarettes as a healthier alternative to traditional cigarettes, according to new, preliminary research that will be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2019—November 16- 18 in Philadelphia. The Association's Scientific Sessions is an annual, premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers who conducted two separate studies report they found e-cigarette smokers had more negative heart disease risk factors—namely, total and LDL cholesterol—and e-cigarettes decrease blood flow in the heart.

According to Rose Marie Robertson, M.D., FAHA, the American Heart Association's deputy chief science and medical officer, "There is no long-term safety data on e-cigarettes. However, there are decades of data for the safety of other nicotine replacement therapies."

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends people quit smoking using smoking cessation aids that are FDA-approved and proven safe and effective. If people choose to use e-cigarettes as they work to stop smoking other tobacco products, they should also plan to subsequently stop using e-cigarettes, because of the lack of information on long-term safety and a growing body of data describing physiologic effects of the components of these devices and the chemical combinations used in them, Robertson said.

E-Cigarette Use is Associated with Altered Lipid Profiles in the CITU Study (Oral Presentation Mo3106)

In one study, researchers compared cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels in healthy adult nonsmokers, e-cigarette (e-cig) smokers, traditional cigarette (t-cig) smokers and dual smokers who use both traditional and e-cigarettes. Researchers evaluated healthy adults (ages 21-45) without existing cardiovascular disease and taking no daily medications in the Cardiovascular Injury due to Tobacco Use (CITU) Study. The study's 476 participants included 94 non-smokers; 45 e-cig smokers; 52 e-cig and t-cig smokers; and 285 t-cig smokers. Analysis was adjusted for age, race, sex, and non-smokers, sole e-cig or t-cig use, or combination e-cig and t-cig use.

Among the study's findings, total cholesterol and the bad cholesterol, LDL, was higher in sole users compared to nonsmokers.

"Although primary care providers and patients may think that the use of e-cigarettes by cigarette smokers makes sense, our study shows is also related to differences in cholesterol levels. The best option is to use FDA-approved methods to aid in smoking cessation, along with behavioral counseling," said study author Sana Majid, M.D., a postdoctoral fellow in vascular biology at the Boston University School of Medicine.


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E-cigarettes take serious toll on heart health, not safer than traditional cigarettes

Citation: E-cigarettes take toll on heart health (2019, November 19) retrieved 11 December 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-11-e-cigarettes-toll-heart-health.html
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