Dresden University of Technology

The Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden (usually translated from German as Dresden University of Technology and abbreviated TU Dresden or TUD) is the largest institute of higher education in the city of Dresden, the largest university in Saxony and one of the 10 largest universities in Germany with 36,066 students as of 2010. The name Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden has only been used since 1961; the history of the university, however, goes back nearly 200 years to 1828. This makes it one of the oldest colleges of technology in Germany, and one of the country's oldest universities, which in German today refers to institutes of higher education which cover the entire curriculum. The university is member of TU9, a consortium of the nine leading German Institutes of Technology. The university is one of eleven universities which succeeded in all three rounds of the German Universities Excellence Initiative in 2012.

Website
http://tu-dresden.de/en
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dresden_University_of_Technology

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