German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases

The German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (German: Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen, DZNE) aims to develop new preventive and therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases. To accomplish this the DZNE follows a translational approach. This means that fundamental research is closely related to clinical research, population studies and health care research. In total there are nine sites all over Germany: Berlin, Bonn, Dresden, Göttingen, Magdeburg, Munich, Rostock / Greifswald, Tübingen and Witten. At each site the DZNE works closely with universities, university hospitals and other partners. The DZNE receives 90 percent of its funding from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and 10 percent from the respective federal states containing DZNE sites.

Website
https://www.dzne.de/en/
Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Center_for_Neurodegenerative_Diseases

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Diabetes

How the body protects itself from type 2 diabetes

A specific group of white blood cells, termed "regulatory T cells," keeps the immune system in balance and suppresses its activity to protect the body against autoimmune diseases. Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative ...

Neuroscience

How fish brain cells react to Alzheimer's disease

Zebrafish, in contrast to humans, have outstanding regenerative capacities: If brain cells are lost due to illness or injury, they will easily regrow from so-called progenitor cells. With sophisticated methods, researchers ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Astrocyte findings suggest new options against Alzheimer's

A study by scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) points to a potential approach against Alzheimer's disease. In studies with mice, the researchers were able to show that blocking a particular ...

Neuroscience

An immunological memory in the brain

Inflammatory reactions can change the brain's immune cells in the long term—meaning that these cells have an "immunological memory." This memory may influence the progression of neurological disorders that occur later in ...

Neuroscience

Getting lost—why older people might lose their way

Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Disease (DZNE) have found a possible explanation for the difficulty in spatial orientation sometimes experienced by elderly people. In the brains of older adults, they ...

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