University of Auckland

The University of Auckland (Māori: Te Whare Wānanga o Tāmaki Makaurau) is a university located in Auckland, New Zealand. It is the largest university in the country and the highest ranked in the 2011 QS World University Rankings, having been ranked 82nd worldwide. Established in 1883 as a constituent college of the University of New Zealand, the university is made up of eight faculties over six campuses, and has more than 39,000 students at April 2010. Over 1,300 doctoral candidates were enrolled at the University of Auckland in 2007. It also provides the most conjoint combinations in New Zealand, with over 50 combinations. Conjoint programs allow students to achieve multiple degrees in a shortened period of time. The University of Auckland began as a constituent of the University of New Zealand, founded on 23 May 1883 as Auckland University College. Stewardship of the University during its establishment period was the responsibility of John Chapman Andrew (Vice Chancellor of the University of New Zealand 1885–1903).

Address
22 Princes Street, Auckland, New Zealand 1010
Website
http://www.auckland.ac.nz/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Auckland

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Autism spectrum disorders

Zinc found to reverse brain cell changes in autism

Cellular changes in the brain caused by genetic mutations that occur in autism can be reversed by zinc, according to research at the University of Auckland.

Medical research

New avenue for understanding cause of common diseases

A ground-breaking Auckland study could lead to discoveries about many common diseases such as diabetes, cancer and dementia. The new finding could also illuminate the broader role of the enigmatic mitochondria in human development.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Superstition can affect eye tests

People having eye examinations may be affecting the results due to a natural tendency to base their responses on past decisions.

Cardiology

Bioeningeers create new virtual 3-D heart for clinical use

A team at the University of Auckland's Bioengineering Institute have created a virtual 3-D heart that could have a major impact on treatment of the most common heart rhythm disturbance, atrial fibrillation (AF).

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