Oncology & Cancer

New regulator of prostate cancer metastasis discovered

A transcription factor normally associated with androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer has a newly discovered role in controlling lipid biosynthesis, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in Nature Genetics.

Medical research

How the cells within breast tumors communicate with each other

An article recently published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation by the group of Dr. Maria Caffarel and Miguel Servet shows for the first time that the proinflammatory cytokine Oncostatin M (OSM) favors breast cancer ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer cells impair blood flow in metastatic lymph nodes

If not caught quickly, cancer cells often spread to other organs in a process called metastasis. Lymph nodes (LNs) are the organs with the highest risk of metastasis. Metastasis in the LNs also influences cancer staging and ...

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Metastasis

Metastasis (Greek: displacement, μετά=next + στάσις=placement, plural: metastases), or Metastatic disease, sometimes abbreviated mets, is the spread of a disease from one organ or part to another non-adjacent organ or part. Only malignant tumor cells and infections have the established capacity to metastasize; however, this is recently reconsidered by new research.

Cancer cells can break away, leak, or spill from a primary tumor, enter lymphatic and blood vessels, circulate through the bloodstream, and settle down to grow within normal tissues elsewhere in the body. Metastasis is one of three hallmarks of malignancy (contrast benign tumors). Most tumors and other neoplasms can metastasize, although in varying degrees (e.g., glioma and basal cell carcinoma rarely metastasize).

When tumor cells metastasize, the new tumor is called a secondary or metastatic tumor, and its cells are like those in the original tumor. This means, for example, that, if breast cancer metastasizes to the lungs, the secondary tumor is made up of abnormal breast cells, not of abnormal lung cells. The tumor in the lung is then called metastatic breast cancer, not lung cancer.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA