Diabetes

Mechanism of impaired wound healing in diabetes identified

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a mechanism that can explain the impaired wound healing in diabetes which can lead to diabetic foot ulcers. The study is published in the scientific journal Proceedings ...

Neuroscience

How clutch molecules enable neuron migration

The brain can discriminate over 1 trillion odors. Once entering the nose, odor-related molecules activate olfactory neurons. Neuron signals first accumulate at the olfactory bulb before being passed on to activate the appropriate ...

Medical research

A single drop of blood makes skin cells line up

What happens to skin cells when they are confronted with blood? A team of researchers from Oslo University Hospital, led by Emma Lång and Stig Ove Bøe, performed experiments on blood-deprived cells that were subsequently ...

Neuroscience

Blood vessels instruct brain development

Function and homeostasis of the brain relies on communication between its complex network of cells. Consequently, development of the different groups of cells in the brain needs to be coordinated in time and space. The group ...

Neuroscience

Potential new approach to the treatment of multiple sclerosis

A prospective new method of treating patients with multiple sclerosis has been proposed by researchers of the Mainz University Medical Center working in cooperation with researchers of the University of Montreal. In model ...

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Cell migration

Cell migration is a central process in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Tissue formation during embryonic development, wound healing and immune responses all require the orchestrated movement of cells in particular directions to specific locations. Errors during this process have serious consequences, including mental retardation, vascular disease, tumor formation and metastasis. An understanding of the mechanism by which cells migrate may lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for controlling , for example, invasive tumour cells. Cells often migrate in response to, and towards, specific external signals, a process called chemotaxis.

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