Obstetrics & gynaecology

How forceps permanently changed the way humans are born

Obstetric forceps look like ninja weapons. They come as a pair: 16 inches of solid steel for each hand with curved "blades" that taper into a set of molded grips. Designed for emergencies that require a quick delivery, they ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Mother or baby die in child birth every 11 seconds: UN

Global child and maternal deaths have fallen sharply in recent decades, but new UN statistics released Thursday show unequal progress, with more than five childbirths a minute ending in tragedy.

Psychology & Psychiatry

It's good for new moms' health when dads can stay home

A new study by Stanford economists shows that giving fathers flexibility to take time off work in the months after their children are born improves the postpartum health and mental well-being of mothers.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Review finds more effective drugs to stop bleeding after childbirth

New evidence from a Cochrane review published today, led by a University of Birmingham scientist, suggests that alternative drugs may be more effective than the standard drug currently used to stop women bleeding after childbirth.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

WHO revises childbirth guidelines to curb caesarean delivery surge

The UN health agency said Thursday it has revised a benchmark used by health professionals worldwide in caring for women during childbirth because it has caused a surge in interventions like caesarean sections that could ...

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Childbirth

Childbirth (also called labour, birth, partus or parturition) is the culmination of a human pregnancy or gestation period with birth of one or more newborn infants from a woman's uterus. The process of normal human childbirth is categorized in three stages of labour: the shortening and dilation of the cervix, descent and birth of the infant, and birth of the placenta.. In some cases, childbirth is achieved through caesarean section, the removal of the neonate through a surgical incision in the abdomen, rather than through vaginal birth.

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