Medical research

Hip fracture risk linked to nanoscale bone inflexibility

The study led by Imperial College London found that flexibility, as well as density, in the bone nanostructure is an important factor in assessing how likely someone is to suffer fractures.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Protein study may be key to treating fibrotic diseases

A protein linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurological disease that causes muscle weakness, may be a key to treating fibrotic disease of the kidneys and other organs, researchers at Vanderbilt ...

Neuroscience

Super particle aims to help stop heart attacks and strokes

By age 20, many adults will have at least some build-up of plaque in their arteries; a condition known as atherosclerosis. Many of us won't even be aware of it. Regardless of whether an atherosclerotic plaque is large or ...

Cardiology

How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks

New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. The study, published in the journal Cell, reveals that a protein known as type 5 collagen ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Ultrasound techniques give warning signs of preterm births

Ultrasound can be used to examine cervix tissue and improve diagnostics, which is essential for predicting preterm births. Ultrasound data is used to compare two techniques for evaluating changes in cervical tissue throughout ...

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Collagen

Collagen /ˈkɒlədʒɨn/ is a group of naturally occurring proteins found in animals, especially in the flesh and connective tissues of mammals. It is the main component of connective tissue, and is the most abundant protein in mammals, making up about 25% to 35% of the whole-body protein content. Collagen, in the form of elongated fibrils, is mostly found in fibrous tissues such as tendon, ligament and skin, and is also abundant in cornea, cartilage, bone, blood vessels, the gut, and intervertebral disc. The fibroblast is the most common cell which creates collagen.

In muscle tissue, it serves as a major component of the endomysium. Collagen constitutes one to two percent of muscle tissue, and accounts for 6% of the weight of strong, tendinous muscles. Gelatin, which is used in food and industry, is collagen that has been irreversibly hydrolyzed.

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