Immunology

Immunity connects gut bacteria and aging

Over the years, researchers have learned that the different populations of bacteria that inhabit the gut have significant effects on body functions, including the immune system. The populations of gut bacteria are sometimes ...

Immunology

Immune response to bacteria—distinguishing helpers from harmers

Some staphylococcus bacteria live peacefully on human skin and membranes in a mutually beneficial relationship with their host, while others are able to exist far from a human host in soil or in water. When we come into contact ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Transplanting good bacteria to kill Staph

Healthy human skin is alive with bacteria. In fact, there are more microorganisms living in and on the human body than there are human cells. Most can live on the human skin without harming the host, but in some people bacteria ...

Medical research

Three lessons gut microbes have taught us about antibiotics

Antibiotics have proven to be a double-edged sword: capable of killing a range of bacteria that cause infections, but also depleting our gut microbes, impairing our immune system, and increasing vulnerability to infection ...

Immunology

Immune cells' bacteria may fight chronic inflammation

A population of bacteria inhabits human and mouse immune cells and appears to protect the body from inflammation and illness, Weill Cornell Medicine scientists discovered in a new study. The findings challenge conventional ...

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