Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Biologists develop novel antiviral approach to dengue fever

The virus that causes dengue fever infects an estimated 390 million people per year. Infection often leads to symptoms so severe that it was once called "breakbone fever" for the pain it causes, or even death. It's the fastest-growing ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Study finds viral protein that causes dengue shock

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have identified a key culprit responsible for the fluid loss and resulting shock that are the hallmark of severe - and potentially fatal - dengue virus infections.

Immunology

Natural lipid acts as potent anti-inflammatory

National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a naturally occurring lipid—a waxy, fatty acid—used by a disease-causing bacterium to impair the host immune response and increase the chance of infection. Inadvertently, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Transgenic mosquito works to control dengue-carrying mosquitos

Releases of the genetically engineered Oxitec mosquito, commonly known as 'Friendly Aedes aegypti', reduced the dengue mosquito population in an area of Juazeiro, Brazil by 95%, well below the modelled threshold for epidemic ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Dengue fever's economic 'bite' estimated

In keeping with the Schneider Institutes for Health Policy's (SIHP) mandate to inform health policy through rigorous economic analyses, a group of SIHP health economists at Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Study could lead to vaccines and treatment for dengue virus

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and the National University of Singapore have determined the structure of a human monoclonal antibody which, in an animal model, strongly neutralizes a type of the potentially lethal dengue ...

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Dengue fever

Dengue fever (pronounced UK: /ˈdɛŋɡeɪ/, US: /ˈdɛŋɡiː/) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are acute febrile diseases, found in the tropics, and caused by four closely related virus serotypes of the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae. It is also known as breakbone fever. The geographical spread includes northern Australia, northern Argentina, and the entire Singapore, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Honduras, Costa Rica, Philippines, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Mexico, Suriname, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Bolivia, Brazil, Guyana, Venezuela, Barbados, Trinidad and Samoa. Unlike malaria, dengue is just as prevalent in the urban districts of its range as in rural areas. Each serotype is sufficiently different that there is no cross-protection and epidemics caused by multiple serotypes (hyperendemicity) can occur. Dengue is transmitted to humans by the Aedes aegypti or more rarely the Aedes albopictus mosquito, which feed during the day.

The WHO says some 2.5 billion people, two fifths of the world's population, are now at risk from dengue and estimates that there may be 50 million cases of dengue infection worldwide every year. The disease is now epidemic in more than 100 countries.

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