Neuroscience

Healthy fats improve nerve function in obese mice

Swapping dietary saturated fats for monounsaturated fats reverses nerve damage and restores nerve function in male mice, finds new preclinical research published in JNeurosci. These data support further investigation of diets ...

Health

The saturated fat debate rages on

(HealthDay)—It's hard to keep up with the findings from studies on the health effects of saturated fat—you know, the fat typically found in animal foods, from red meat to whole milk. But one thing's certain.

Health

Try this healthy makeover for a favorite fast food

(HealthDay)—Take-out pizza is the ultimate fast food—gooey cheese, salty sauce, fatty pepperoni, all baked on top of what's basically white bread. But there's no need to feel guilty about enjoying a hot slice once you've ...

Medical research

Scientists find new clues about how the body stores fat

Fat, biologically speaking, is not a bad thing. Fatty acids—the molecular building blocks for body fat—are crucial to the formation of cell walls and for storing energy in the form of glycerolipids. Now, Rockefeller scientists ...

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Fat

Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. Chemically, fats are generally triesters of glycerol and fatty acids. Fats may be either solid or liquid at normal room temperature, depending on their structure and composition. Although the words "oils", "fats", and "lipids" are all used to refer to fats, "oils" is usually used to refer to fats that are liquids at normal room temperature, while "fats" is usually used to refer to fats that are solids at normal room temperature. "Lipids" is used to refer to both liquid and solid fats, along with other related substances. The word "oil" is used for any substance that does not mix with water and has a greasy feel, such as petroleum (or crude oil) and heating oil, regardless of its chemical structure.

Fats form a category of lipid, distinguished from other lipids by their chemical structure and physical properties. This category of molecules is important for many forms of life, serving both structural and metabolic functions. They are an important part of the diet of most heterotrophs (including humans). Fats or lipids are broken down in the body by enzymes called lipases produced in the pancreas.

Examples of edible animal fats are lard (pig fat), fish oil, and butter or ghee. They are obtained from fats in the milk, meat and under the skin of the animal. Examples of edible plant fats are peanut, soya bean, sunflower, sesame, coconut, olive, and vegetable oils. Margarine and vegetable shortening, which can be derived from the above oils, are used mainly for baking. These examples of fats can be categorized into saturated fats and unsaturated fats.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA