Genetics

New method for genetic analysis of resting human immune cells

CD4+ T cells are important parts of the immune system and play a key role in defending the body against pathogens. As they possess a great variety of defense mechanisms against HIV in their resting state, they are infected ...

Medical research

Biosensor barcodes identify, detail 'chatting' among cancer cells

Ever since the first barcode appeared on a pack of chewing gum in 1974, the now-ubiquitous system has enabled manufacturers, retailers and consumers to quickly and effectively identify, characterize, locate and track products ...

Oncology & Cancer

Engineers report advance in rapid cancer detection and monitoring

When it comes to cancer detection, size matters. Traditional diagnostic imaging cannot detect tumors smaller than a certain size, causing missed opportunities for early detection and treatment. Circulating tumor exosomes ...

Inflammatory disorders

Analyzing kidney stones using geology and cancer screening techniques

Up to 15% of people will experience kidney stones, and for 50% of those that do, they will recur. It is therefore important to understand as much as possible about how kidney stones form to improve both prevention and treatment. ...

Medical research

Easy detection of fluorescence emitted by protein behind aging

Professor Emeritus Yoshikazu Nishikawa of Osaka City University's Graduate School of Human Life Science, and collaborators, have found that a substance that emits a specific fluorescence in vivo increases with age. The fluorescence ...

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Fluorescence

Fluorescence is the emission of light by a substance that has absorbed light or other electromagnetic radiation of a different wavelength. It is a form of luminescence. In most cases, emitted light has a longer wavelength, and therefore lower energy, than the absorbed radiation. However, when the absorbed electromagnetic radiation is intense, it is possible for one electron to absorb two photons; this two-photon absorption can lead to emission of radiation having a shorter wavelength than the absorbed radiation.

The most striking examples of fluorescence occur when the absorbed radiation is in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum, and thus invisible to the human eye, and the emitted light is in the visible region.

Fluorescence has many practical applications, including mineralogy, gemology, chemical sensors (fluorescence spectroscopy), fluorescent labelling, dyes, biological detectors, and, most commonly, fluorescent lamps.

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