Surgery

New approach to real-time monitoring after pancreatic surgery

Complications after pancreatic surgery are common and can be life-threatening. One of the most serious yet common complications is postoperative pancreatic fistula. This condition is diagnosed based on increased concentrations ...

Neuroscience

Study sheds light on the brain's remarkable recycling system

Researchers at Auburn University have made a discovery that sheds light on how our brain cells manage to efficiently replace older proteins. This process is crucial for maintaining effective neural communication and ensuring ...

page 1 from 29

Fluorescence

Fluorescence is the emission of light by a substance that has absorbed light or other electromagnetic radiation of a different wavelength. It is a form of luminescence. In most cases, emitted light has a longer wavelength, and therefore lower energy, than the absorbed radiation. However, when the absorbed electromagnetic radiation is intense, it is possible for one electron to absorb two photons; this two-photon absorption can lead to emission of radiation having a shorter wavelength than the absorbed radiation.

The most striking examples of fluorescence occur when the absorbed radiation is in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum, and thus invisible to the human eye, and the emitted light is in the visible region.

Fluorescence has many practical applications, including mineralogy, gemology, chemical sensors (fluorescence spectroscopy), fluorescent labelling, dyes, biological detectors, and, most commonly, fluorescent lamps.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA