Autism spectrum disorders

Study finds transgender, non-binary autism link

New research indicates that transgender and non-binary individuals are significantly more likely to have autism or display autistic traits than the wider population—a finding that has important implications for gender confirmation ...

Health

Gender bias continues in recognition of physicians and nurses

A new study has shown that patients are significantly more likely to correctly identify male physicians and female nurses, demonstrating continuing gender bias in the health care environment. These lingering perceptions may ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Anthropologist explores 'the science of dads'

Want to do something special for a father on June 16? Try asking him what he finds most rewarding—and most challenging—about being a dad.

Psychology & Psychiatry

The impact of gender norms on health

The standards and expectations to which men and woman generally conform impact health across life stages, health sectors and world regions, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Physician burnout has disproportionate effect on women

While physician burnout has become a reality across the profession, its disproportionate impact on women should sound an alarm within the heath-care sector that more supports need to be offered, according to a recent Western ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

In the long run, funny women satisfy men more

Yes, women expect men who are courting them to make them laugh. But a woman who can make her partner laugh is equally, if not more, important to the guy's long-term happiness in the relationship.

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Gender

Gender comprises a range of differences between men and women, extending from the biological to the social. At the biological level, men and women are typically distinguished by the presence of a Y-chromosome in male cells, and its absence in female cells. At the social level, however, there is debate regarding the extent to which the various biological differences necessitate differences in social gender roles and gender identity, which has been defined as "an individual's self-conception as being male or female, as distinguished from actual biological sex."

The word "gender" has several definitions. Colloquially, it is used interchangeably with "sex" to denote the condition of being male or female, but in the social sciences it refers to specifically social differences, such as but not limited to gender identity. More recently, it has been equated with "sexual orientation" and "identity" (especially LGBT sexuality).[citation needed] People whose gender identity feels incongruent with their biological sex may refer to themselves as "intergender".

Many languages have a system of grammatical gender, a type of noun class system—nouns may be classified as masculine or feminine (for example Spanish, Hebrew, Arabic and French) and may also have a neuter grammatical gender (for example Sanskrit, German, Polish, and the Scandinavian languages). In such languages, this is essentially a convention, which may have little or no connection to the meaning of the words. Likewise, a wide variety of phenomena have characteristics termed gender, by analogy with male and female bodies (such as the gender of connectors and fasteners) or due to societal norms.

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