Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Toxoplasmosis: Preventing mother-to-child transmission

Professor Maritza Jaramillo knows a thing or two about parasites—she has spent most of her life studying them. "During my bachelor's degree in Colombia, I did an internship at a lab specializing in parasitic infections. ...

Health

Memory is damaged by air pollution, researchers find

New research from the University of Warwick shows that human memory is significantly worse in parts of England with high levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and air particulates (PM10). The difference in memory quality between ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Ebola virus now squeezed into 'corner' of DR Congo: WHO

Efforts to halt an Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo have made "significant progress", with the virus now contained to a far smaller and mainly rural area, the World Health Organization (WHO) said Thursday.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Wild boars, hunting dogs and hunters carry tick-borne bacteria

Rickettsia bacteria cause a number of human and animal infections, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have for the first time surveyed the prevalence of ...

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World population

The term world population commonly refers to the total number of living humans on Earth at a given time. As of 29 July 2009, the Earth's population is estimated by the United States Census Bureau to be 6.774 billion. The world population has been growing continuously since the end of the Black Death around 1400. There were also short term falls at other times due to plague, for example in the mid 17th century (see graph). The fastest rates of world population growth (above 1.8%) were seen briefly during the 1950s then for a longer period during the 1960s and 1970s (see graph). According to population projections, world population will continue to grow until around 2050. The 2008 rate of growth has almost halved since its peak of 2.2% per year, which was reached in 1963. World births have levelled off at about 134-million-per-year, since their peak at 163-million in the late 1990s, and are expected to remain constant. However, deaths are only around 57 million per year, and are expected to increase to 90 million by the year 2050. Since births outnumber deaths, the world's population is expected to reach about 9 billion by the year 2040.

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